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VITRUVIUS
THE TEN BOOKS ON ARCHITECTURE

TRANSLATED BY
MORRIS HICKY MORGAN, PH.D., LL.D.

LATE PROFESSOR OF CLASSICAL PHILOLOGY
IN HARVARD UNIVERSITY

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND ORIGINAL DESIGNS
PREPARED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF


HERBERT LANGFORD WARREN, A.M.


NELSON ROBINSON JR. PROFESSOR OF

ARCHITECTURE


IN HARVARD UNIVERSITY


CAMBRIDGE


HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESS

LONDON: HUMPHREY MILFORD
OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

1914

COPYRIGHT, HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESS

Page 2

CONTENTS
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INDEX







PREFACE

During the last years of his life, Professor Morgan had devoted
much time and energy to the preparation of a translation of
Vitruvius, which he proposed to supplement with a revised text,
illustrations, and notes. He had completed the translation, with
the exception of the last four chapters of the tenth book, and had
discussed, with Professor Warren, the illustrations intended for
the first six books of the work; the notes had not been arranged
or completed, though many of them were outlined in the
manuscript, or the intention to insert them indicated. The several
books of the translation, so far as it was completed, had been
read to a little group of friends, consisting of Professors Sheldon
and Kittredge, and myself, and had received our criticism, which
had, at times, been utilized in the revision of the work.

After the death of Professor Morgan, in spite of my obvious
incompetency from a technical point of view, I undertook, at the
request of his family, to complete the translation, and to see the

Page 221

CHAPTER VII

THE GREEK HOUSE

1. The Greeks, having no use for atriums, do not build them,
but make passage-ways for people entering from the front door,
not very wide, with stables on one side and doorkeepers' rooms
on the other, and shut off by doors at the inner end.




PLAN OF VITRUVIUS' GREEK HOUSE ACCORDING TO BECKER


This place between the two doors is termed in Greek

colonnades on three sides, and on the side facing the south it has
two antae, a considerable distance apart, carrying an architrave,

Page 222

with a recess for a distance one third less than the space between
the antae. This space is called by some writers "prostas," by
others "pastas."

2. Hereabouts, towards the inner side, are the large rooms in
which mistresses of houses sit with their wool-spinners. To the
right and left of the prostas there are chambers, one of which is
called the "thalamos," the other the "amphithalamos." All round
the colonnades are dining rooms for everyday use, chambers,
and rooms for the slaves. This part of the house is termed
"gynaeconitis."

3. In connexion with these there are ampler sets of apartments
with more sumptuous peristyles, surrounded by four colonnades
of equal height, or else the one which faces the south has higher
columns than the others. A peristyle that has one such higher
colonnade is called a Rhodian peristyle. Such apartments have
fine entrance courts with imposing front doors of their own; the
colonnades of the peristyles are decorated with polished stucco
in relief and plain, and with coffered ceilings of woodwork; off
the colonnades that face the north they have Cyzicene dining
rooms and picture galleries; to the east, libraries; exedrae to the
west; and to the south, large square rooms of such generous
dimensions that four sets of dining couches can easily be
arranged in them, with plenty of room for serving and for the
amusements.

4. Men's dinner parties are held in these large rooms; for it was
not the practice, according to Greek custom, for the mistress of
the house to be present. On the contrary, such peristyles are
called the men's apartments, since in them the men can stay
without interruption from the women. Furthermore, small sets of
apartments are built to the right and left, with front doors of

Page 442

Zeno, 195.

Zodiac, 257 f.f.

Zoilus (Homeromastix), 197.





FOOTNOTES:

[1] Reading aeque tantam as in new Rose. Codd. sextantem; Schn.
quadrantem.

[2] Codd. altitudo.

[3] That is: two metopes with a triglyph between them, and half of the
triglyph on either side.

[4] Codd. duae.

[5] 1 Codd. quarto.

[6] Codd. CC. & L.

[7] The remainder of this section is omitted from the translation as being
an obvious interpolation.

[8] Codd. diatessaron, which is impossible, paramese being the concord
of the fourth to the chromatic meson, and identical with the chromatic
synhemmenon.

[9] Codd. fuerat.

[10] Here something is lost, as also in chapter III, sections 5 and 6.

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[11] From this point to the end of section 3 the text is often hopelessly
corrupt. The translation follows, approximately, the manuscript reading,
but cannot pretend to be exact.

[12] 1 the dots here and in what follows, indicate lacunae in the
manuscripts.

















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