Download Urban Design: Method and Techniques PDF

TitleUrban Design: Method and Techniques
Author
File Size5.4 MB
Total Pages207
Table of Contents
                            Urban Design: Method and Techniques
Copyright Page
Contents
Preface
Notes on the authors
Acknowledgements
Chapter 1. Definitions
Chapter 2. Negotiating the programme
Chapter 3. Survey techniques
Chapter 4. Analysis
Chapter 5. Generating alternatives
Chapter 6. Project evaluation
Chapter 7. Presentation
Chapter 8. Project management
Chapter 9. Conclusion
Figure sources
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

URBAN DESIGN:
METHOD AND TECHNIQUES

Page 103

U R B A N D E S I G N : M E T H O D A N D T E C H N I Q U E S

9 2

Figure 5.5 Ecological

garden design.

Page 104

quarter, or in Mollinson’s terms, the village; the
street block surrounding its own green space; the
individual home with its own supporting garden;
and the green wedge connecting the city centre to
the surrounding countryside.

A technique used in permaculture and appropri-
ate for urban design is systems analysis. A clear
distinction exists between the ‘closed system’ of
thermodynamics and the ‘open system’ of living
organisms. Two quotes taken from Mollinson make
this point graphically:14

All living organisms ... are ‘open systems’; that is to
say, they maintain their complex forms and
functions through continuous exchanges of

energies and materials with their environment.
Instead of ‘running down’ like a clock that dissi-
pates its energy through friction, the living organ-
ism is constantly ‘building up’ more complex
substances from the substance it feeds on, more
complex forms of energies from the energies it
absorbs, and more complex patterns of information
... perceptions, feelings, thoughts ... from the input
of its receptor organs.

Most thermodynamic problems concern ‘closed’
systems, where the reactions take place in confine-
ment, and can be reversed; an example is the
expansion and compression of gas in a cylinder.
But in an open system, energy is gained or lost
irreversibly, and the system, its environment, or

G E N E R A T I N G A L T E R N A T I V E S

9 3

Figure 5.6 Ecological

garden design.

Page 206

Quarter, 45, 46

Radiant City, 88
Radical planning, 10
Rainaldi, 29
Regional multiplier, analysis and theory, 145
Report writing, 151-153, 187
Restraining forces, 180
Richardson, H. V., 146
Risk analysis, 175–176
Roche, C., 86
Rome, 131
Rome, Nolli’s Map, 51, 53
Rome, Piazza Annunziata, 54
Rome, Piazza del Popolo, 28, 29, 45
Rome, planning by Sixtus V, 30-32
Rome, S. Maria Maggiore, 30
Rome, The Spanish Steps, 31

Sangallo, The Elder, 29
Scale models, 163
Scenario, 67, 69
Scientific method, 6–7
Second designer, 29
Sieve mapping, 70
Single Regeneration Budget, 17
Sitte, C., 43, 66
SMART objectives, 179
Soria y Mata, A., 88
Sotsograd, 89
Straw, F. I., 66
Summerson, J., 131
Surrey, 87, 99
Survey, 67, 186
Sustainability, 2-4
Sustainable development, 10, 185–187
SWOT analysis, 67, 186
Synoptic, planning, 9, 185, 186
Systemic analysis, 136

Systems analysis, closed system , 93
Systems analysis, open system, 93, 94

Town and Country Planning Act, 21
Town and Country Planning Act 1990, Section 26B

Scotland, 143
Town and Country Planning Act 1990, Section 71A,

143
Town and Country Planning Regulations 1988,

Annex II, 145
Town and Country Planning Regulations 1995,

143
Town trails, 62, 64
Transactive planning, 9
Trend, 67
Tromso, 118
Turner, T., 16

Unwin, R., 89
Urban design method, 1-2,5,9
Urban design technology, 2
Urban development, 2
Urban fabric, 43
Urban form, 34
Urban grain, 28
Urban realm, 27
Urban structure, 28, 34, 43
Urban Villages Forum, 16
Utilitarian philosophy, 185

Valadier, 28
Viability, 19
Vision, 187
Visual presentation, 155
Vitality, 16–17, 22

Wood, J. the Elder, 127, 131
Woonerf, 50
Work breakdown structure, 176–177, 179

I N D E X

1 9 5

Page 207

This Page Intentionally Left Blank

Similer Documents