Download The Rough Guide to Sci-Fi Movies 1 PDF

TitleThe Rough Guide to Sci-Fi Movies 1
PublisherRough Guides
ISBN 139781843535201
CategoryArts - Film
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size19.8 MB
Total Pages338
Table of Contents
                            Cover
Copyright page
Contents
Introduction
	Acknowledgements
	Science Fiction, Sci-Fi or SF?
The Origins: science fiction literature
	Greek science fiction... and beyond
		Kepler, More and others
		Speculative fiction
		Jonathan Swift and the
moons of Mars
		Shelley, Verne and Wells
		Other icons of early science fiction
	The rise of modern science fiction
		Astounding writers
		Campbell's bomb
		The Golden Age of
Science Fiction
		Beyond the Golden Age
			Hard science fiction
			Military science fiction
			Dystopian science fiction
			Alternate history stories
			Steampunk
			New wave
			Cyberpunk
			Post-Cyberpunk
			The Russians are coming, the Russians are coming
		Feminism and alternative sexuality in
science fiction literature
			Gay and lesbian sci-fi
		From the book to the film
			Isaac Asimov
			Heinlein's Starship Troopers
			Tie-in novels
			Michael Crichton
			Philip K. Dick
			Comics and science fiction movie
			Frank Herbert
			Stanislaw Lern
			Coming soon...
The History: a warp-speed tour of sci-fi film
	1902–29: The silent era
	Where to find early science fiction films
	The 1930s & 40s:
Mad scientists and serials
	Flying saucer attack
	The 1950s: The Golden Age
of sci-fi film
	1960–1976: Sci-fi film grows up
	1977: Star Wars and the
new era of spectacle
	Before and after Star Wars
	The highest-grossing sci-fi films of all time...
	1990s: The digital era
	2000s:
Sci-fi film, here and now
The Canon: 50 sci-fi classics
	A Clockwork Orange
	The Adventures of
Buckaroo Banzai
Across the 8th
Dimension!
	Akira
	Alien
		Jones
		The Conrad
connection
	Aliens
		Alien: the saga continued
	Alphaville
(une étrange aventure de
Lemmy Caution)
	Back To The Future
		Back again...
	Blade Runner
		The unicorn riddle
	Brazil
	Bride Of Frankenstein
	The Brother From
Another Planet
	Close Encounters Of
The Third Kind
	Contact
	The Damned
(aka These Are the
Damned)
	The Day The Earth
Stood Still
	Delicatessen
		The City Of Lost Children
	Destination Moon
	Escape From
New York
	E.T. The
Extraterrestrial
		E. T. sweetie
	Flash Gordon:
Space Soldiers
	The Fly
	Forbidden Planet
	Ghost In The Shell
	Gojira (aka Godzilla)
	The Incredibles
	Invasion Of The Body
Snatchers
	Jurassic Park
	Mad Max 2 (aka The
Road Warrior)
	The Matrix
	Metropolis
	On The Beach
	Planet Of The Apes
	Robocop
	Sleeper
	Solaris (aka Solyaris)
	Star Trek II:
The Wrath Of Khan
		The sequels...
		Picard and co.
	Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope
		Adventures Of The
Starkiller...
	Star Wars: Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back
		Star Wars: the second trilogy...
	The Stepford Wives
	Superman
		More Superman...
	Terminator 2:
Judgement Day
	The Thing From
Another World
	Things To Come
		Another Shape of Things To Come...
	Tron
	12 Monkeys
	28 Days Later...
	20,000 Leagues Under
The Sea
	2001 : A Space
Odyssey
	Le voyage dans
la lune
(A Trip To The Moon)
	War Of The Worlds
		Independence Day
The Icons: faces of sci-fi film
	Rick Baker
	Roy Batty
	Chesley Bonestell
	C-3P0 & R2D2
	Wendy Carlos
	Doug Chiang
	Buster Crabbe
	Darth Vader
	John Dykstra
	Danny Elfman
	Harrison Ford
	H.R. Giger
	Jerry Goldsmith
	Gort
	HAL
	Ray Harryhausen
	Iconic spacecraft
	Charlton Heston
	Gale Ann Hurd
	Directors: the next generation
	Ishiro Honda
	Stanley Kubrick
	Fritz Lang
	George Lucas
	Ralph McQuarrie
	Ming the Merciless
	Willis H. O'Brien
	George Pal
	The Pod People
	Robbie The Robot
	Arnold Schwarzenegger
	Ridley Scott
	Agent Smith
	Will Smith
	Steven Spielberg
	Tomoyuki Tanaka
	Osamu Tezuka
	Leon Theremin
	Overrated icons
	Douglas Trumbull
	Sigourney Weaver
	Female icons of sci-fi
	James Whale
	John Williams
	Iconic bad acting
The Crossovers: blurring sci-fi
	Fantasy
		Boys against girls
		Sci-fi's raw deal
		The overlap
		May The Force be with you
	Action-adventure
		James Bond
		Techno-thrillers
		Sci-fi sport
	Comedy
		Satire
		A twist of sci-fi
	Horror
		EVP
		David Cronenberg: master of horror science fiction
	Drama
		The Truman Show
	Animation
		Hollywood toons
		Video game crossovers
		Global toons
		Time travel – it's everywhere
	Superheroes and comic books
	Westerns and musicals
		Sci-fi gunslingers
		Sci-fi songs
	Family
		Disney
		More family fun
The Science: theories that fuel sci-fi
	Bad science
		The Core: magnetic mayhem
		Spotting "bad science"
	Could that happen?
		Sound in space
		Humanoid aliens
		Slow light
		Large movie monsters
		Virtual worlds
		Instant evolution
		Artificial intelligence
		Faster than light travel
		Time travel
		Teleportation
	Better science
		What the movies missed
		From fiction to science
The Locations: star tours
	Where the sci-fi films get made
		California
		Hollywood's home town
		The UK
		Canada
		Australia
		Eastern Europe
	Sci-fi's favourite settings
		Arctic/Antarctic
		Australia/New Zealand
		London
		Los Angeles
		New York City
		The best apocalypses
		The oceans
		Other US cities
		Paris
		Tokyo
		Washington, DC
	Sci-fi in the solar system
		The moon
		The newest location: inside the computer
		Mars
		Other planetary visits
	Memorable sci-fi planets
		The Star Wars package tour
Global: sci-fi film around the world
	Australia
	Canada
	Dominance and dependence
	France
	Dominique Pinon
	Germany
	Hong Kong
	India
	Italy
	Budgeting science fiction
	Japan
	Directors Hollywood has stolen
	The languages of science
fiction film
	Mexico
	South Korea
	Spain
	USSR/Russia
Information: the wider picture
	Audiovisual
		Sci-fi on TV
			TV anime
		Video games
			Star Wars: the video-game empire
		Film soundtracks
	Websites
		General
			Global sci-fi...
		Movies
	Events
		Conventions
		Film festivals
	In print
		Science fiction magazines
		Books
Picture credits
	Cover Credits
	Illustrations
Index
	Numbers
	A
	B
	C
	D
	E
	F
	G
	H
	I
	J
	K
	L
	M
	N
	O
	P
	Q
	R
	S
	T
	U
	V
	W
	X
	Y
	Z
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 169

Iconic spacecraft
• The Martian War Machines [War Of The Worlds,
1953). H.G. Wells's original novel had the Martian War
Machines as interplanetary tanks on tripods, but the
original film's effects crews did away with the physi-
cal legs, choosing instead to reimagine them along the
lines of the "classic" flying saucers (with a stalk-like eye
to shoot their deadly beams). The result was elegant
and still surprisingly effective.

• The Discovery {2001: A Space Odyssey, 1968).
The Discovery is probably the most realistic fictional
spacecraft that's made it to the big screen, as Stanley
Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke designed it with
the real world in mind - it takes the ship a sig-
nificantly long time to travel to Jupiter, and its
design is constructed to deal with the problems
of weightlessness (and passenger boredom). And
as par for the course for director Kubrick, the ship
is painstakingly detailed: sharp eyes will note the
instructions on how to replace the explosive bolts
on the escape pods - which would be necessary
in the real world but which other directors and
set designers might just as easily skip. It's also
- thanks to the still stunning special effects - the
first movie spaceship which gives the impression
of genuine mass; The Discovery looked like more
than a plastic model on a wire.

• The Death Star {Star Wars, 1977). The Star
Wars films are so jammed with iconic spacecraft, from
the TIE fighters to the Millennium Falcon, that it's hard
to choose just one to represent the film series. But if
you're going to pick, go for volume - and the Death
Star (famously confused by Han Solo for a small moon)
has got volume, and then some. It can also destroy
entire planets, which is not to be ignored lightly. And
for the being the mightiest spacecraft ever, it's got the
most ridiculous Achilles heel (would it have killed some
Imperial bean counter to shell out for a photon torpe-
do-resistant grate on that exhaust vent?).

THE ICONS: FACES OF SCI-FI FILM

• The Enterprise {Star Trek: The Motion Picture,
1979) Probably the single most recognizable space-
ship in science fiction film, recognition that was aided
immensely by its constant presence on television. It's
also probably the most-abused spacecraft in science
fiction film history; in the ten Star Trek films (spanning
both eras of the television show), the Enterprise is par-
tially or completely destroyed several times, which does
make one wonder why captains Kirk and Picard are so
easily given the keys to new versions after wrecking
the previous ones.

• The Close Encounters Spacecraft {Close
Encounters Of The Third Kind, 1977). A spiky wedding-
cake of lights which was inspired, in part, by a brightly-
lit oil refinery that director Steven Spielberg saw while
filming in India. The actual model of the spacecraft was
given over to that ultimate repository of iconography
- the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC. In an
interesting salute to another iconographie science fic-
tion entity, a small R2D2 can be seen as part of the
ship model.

157

Page 170

THE ICONS: FACES OF SCI-FI FILM

Over the next three decades, Harryhausen
would provide stop-motion effects for a number
of science fiction epics, including 20 Million
Miles To Earth (1957), Mysterious Island (1961),
First Men In The Moon (1964) and One Million
Years, BC (1966; although in that film, perhaps
the most memorable effect was Raquel Welch in
her bikini), as well as the famous Sinbad fantasy
swashbucklers and Jason And The Argonauts (1963),
the rattling armoured skeletons arguably being
Harryhausen's best-known work. Harryhausen's
last picture was 1981s Clash Of The Titans, and in
1992 he was given an honorary Academy Award,
while sly tributes to the man and his work pop
up in movies from time to time, most memora-
bly in Pixar's Monsters, Inc. (2001), in which the
poshest restaurant in Monstropolis is named after
him (and in true tribute geekery, the octopus

Harryhausen at work on a model for

The Seventh Voyage Of Sinbad (1958)

158

in the restaurant has only six tentacles - like the
octopus Harryhausen created for 1955's It Came
From Beneath The Sea).

„.."" The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms
ü ü dir Eugène Lourie, 1953, US, 80m, b/w

It's that old "nuclear bomb awakens that which should not
be awakened" plot line, and this time it's Coney Island that
suffers the creature's wrath. You won't be watching this
for the story or the acting, which are leaden and wooden,
respectively, but to be amazed at how much effects man
Ray Harryhausen got out of so little.

Charlton Heston
Actor, 1 9 2 4 -

Unlike every other acting icon listed here,
Charlton Heston was already a huge star before
he came to science fiction; he was (and is) most
famous for his historical and Biblical epics,
including The Ten Commandments and Ben Hur.
He was still immensely popular in 1968, the year
Planet Of The Apes came out, and because of that
he gave the film and the still largely low-rent
genre of sci-fi something it only rarely had to
that point — genuine credibility. Planet Of The
Apes has several A-list talents in it, to be sure, but
Heston's participation made the film a genuine
mass-culture event, and gave science fiction its
first genuinely bankable star since Buster Crabbe
in the 1930s.

Heston would use his box-office clout in
two other science fiction epics of the early 70s
- 1971 's The Omega Man, in which the stal-
wart Heston battles post-apocalyptic hippies, and
1973's Soylent Green, where Heston is a private
investigator in a shabby, overpopulated future
who stumbles upon the truth about a popular
foodstuff (see Canon). Heston would also make
a brief appearance in Beneath The Planet Of The

Page 337

THE ROUGH GUIDE TO SCI-FI MOVIES: INDEX

Ymadawiad Arthur 265 " 7
Yoda121, 123, 171 *-
Yor. Hunter from The Future 262

York, Michael 40, 261 Zavitz, Lee 81
Young Einstein 228 Zelazny, Roger 13
Young Frankenstein 7 1 , 187, 188 Zemeckis, Robert 62, 64, 75

Young, James 130 Zhuralev, Vasili 273
Young, Sean 64 Zsigmond, Vilmos 73
Yusov,Vadim112 Zukor, Adolph 32, 222

325

Page 338

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