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TitleThe Complete Film Production Handbook
PublisherFocal Press
ISBN 139780240811505
CategoryArts - Film
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size10.6 MB
Total Pages545
Table of Contents
                            The Complete Film Production Handbook
Copyright Page
Dedication
Companion Website
Contents
Introduction
Acknowledgments
The Forms in the Book
Chapter 1: The Production Team and Who Does What
	Introduction
	Producers
		Executive Producer
		Producer
		Co-Producer
		Line Producer
		Post Production Producer
		Associate Producer
	Production Management
		Unit Production Manager
		First Assistant Director
		Second Assistant Director
		Production Supervisor
		Production Coordinator
Chapter 2: The Production Office
	Introduction
	Office Space
	Setting Up
		Phone Systems
	The Traveling Production Kit
	Answering the Phone
	Confidentiality
		Shredding
		Watermarking
	Production Assistants
	Interns
	Ain't Technology Great?
		Techie Wanted
	Employees Driving Their Own Vehicles for Business Purposes
	Staff Scheduling and Assignment of Duties
	Staff Meetings
	Office Lunches
	Time Management
	Office Inventories, Logs, and Sign-Out Sheets
	The Files
		Files of Blank Forms
		Files for Features, Movies for Television, Cable orInternet
		Series Files
		Day Files
	Forms in This Chapter
Chapter 3: Basic Accounting
	Introduction
	The Production Accountant
	The Accounting Department
	Handling Payroll
	Payroll Companies
	Accounting Guidelines
		Start Paperwork Packets
		Payroll
		Box Rentals
		Vendor Accounts
		Competitive Bids
		Purchase Orders
		Check Requests
		Petty Cash
		Online Purchases
		Cell Phone Reimbursement
		Auto Allowances
		Mileage Reimbursement
		Drive-To
		Per Diem and Living Allowance
		Invoicing
		Additional Taxable Income
	The Budget
	Tracking Costs
	The Audit
	Forms in This Chapter
Chapter 4: From Script to Schedule
	Introduction
	It All Starts with a Script
		Script Revisions
	The Breakdown
	The Board
	The Schedule
		Day-Out-of-Days
		Breakdowns
Chapter 5: Incentives
	Introduction
	The Evolution of Incentive Programs
	In Flux
	What to Consider
	Infrastructure
	Types of Incentives
		Rebate
		Tax Credits
		Refundable Tax Credits
		Transferable Tax Credits
		Nonrefundable, Nontransferable Tax Credits
		Up-Front or Back-End Funding
	Conclusion
Chapter 6: Pre-Production
	What Is Pre-Production?
	Establishing Company Policies
	Stages
	Meetings, Meetings, and More Meetings
	Communications
		Cellular Phones, BlackBerrys, Wireless Internet and More
		Walkie-Talkies
	Previsualization
	Plan Ahead
	Sample Pre-Production Schedule
		Week #1 (8 weeks to go)
		Week #2 (7 weeks to go)
		Week #3 (6 weeks to go)
		Week #4 (5 weeks to go)
		Week #5 (4 weeks to go)
		Week #6 (3 weeks to go)
		Week #7 (2 weeks to go)
		Week #8 (final week of prep)
	Daily Prep Schedules
	More on Logs and Sign-Out Sheets
	Distribution
	Collecting Information and Making Lists
		Crew Information Sheet
		The Crew List
		The Executive Staff List
		The Cast List
		The Contact List
	Better Safe than Sorry
	Pre-Production Checklist
		Starting from Scratch
	Creating Your Own Production Manual
	For Your Own Good
	Forms in This Chapter
Chapter 7: Insurance Requirements
	Introduction
	General Insurance Guidelines
	Errors and Omissions (E&O)
	Comprehensive General Liability
	Certificates of Insurance
	Hired, Loaned, Donated or Nonowned Auto Liability
	Hired, Loaned or Donated Auto Physical Damage
	Workers' Compensation and Employer's Liability
	Guild/Union Accident Coverage
	Production Package (Portfolio Policy)
		Cast Insurance
		Essential Elements
		Bereavement Coverage
		Production Media (Film, Digital Elements or Other Medium)/Direct Physical Loss
		Faulty Stock, Camera and Processing
		Props, Sets and Scenery; Costumes and Wardrobe; Miscellaneous Rented Equipment; Office Contents
		Extra Expense
		Third-Party Property Damage
	Supplemental (or Optional) Coverages
		Umbrella (Excess Liability)
		Use of Aircraft
		Use of Watercraft
		Use of Railroads or Railroad Facilities
		Use of Valuables
		Use of Livestock or Animals
		Signal Interruption Insurance
		Foreign Package Policy
		Political Risk Insurance
		Weather Insurance
	Completion Bonds
	Claims Reporting Procedures
		Submitting Claims
	Forms in This Chapter
Chapter 8: During the Shoot
	The Prep Continues
	The Set
	Communications
	The Daily Routine
	Call Sheets and Production Reports
	Paperwork from the Set
	The Script Supervisor's Role
	The Day Before
	Reshoots
	Daily Wrap
	On the Lighter Side
	Forms in This Chapter
Chapter 9: Building Strong Industry Relationships: Making Good Deals and Navigating The Politics
	Introduction
	Vendors
		Negotiating with Vendors
	Studio and Network Executives
	Agents
	Your Crew
		Negotiating Tips for Hiring Crew
	Avoid Cutting Off Your Nose to Spite Your Face
	Standards of Business Conduct
	Politics and Principles
		#1: Jonathan Sanger (Elephant Man, Frances, Vanilla Sky, Suspect Zero, The Producers)
		#2: A Top Production Exective(who prefers to remain anonymous)
		#3: Ira Shuman (Just Married, Cheaper by the Dozen, The Pink Panther, Night at the Museum,The Pink Panther 2, The Spy Next Door)
	A Producer's Mission
Chapter 10: Deal Memos
	Introduction
	The Cast Deal Memo
	Crew Deal Memos
	Writers' Deal Memos
	DGA Deal Memos
	Forms in This Chapter
Chapter 11: Unions and Guilds
	Introduction
	An Overview of Industry Unions and Guilds
	Union versus Nonunion Shows
	Becoming a Union Member
	Becoming a Union Signatory
	More Specifically
		Screen Actors Guild (SAG) SAGIndie
			Short Film Agreement
			Ultra-Low-Budget Agreement
			Modified Low-Budget Agreement
			Low-Budget Agreement
		AFTRA
		Directors Guild of America(DGA)
			Getting into the DGA
			Creative Rights
		Writers Guild of America (WGA)
		The Producers Guild of America (PGA)
	The Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP)
	Contract Services Administration Trust Fund
	SAG, DGA and WGA: Forms and Reports
	Union and Guild Contact Information
Chapter 12: Principal Talent
	Introduction
	With a Little Help from Technology
	Follow-Through After an Actor's Been Cast
	Work Calls
	Performer Categories
	Stunt Performer Categories
	Interviews
	Workweek
	Rest Periods
	Consecutive Employment
	Transportation and Location Expenses
	Looping
	Dubbing (Theatrical Motion Pictures Only)
	The Employment of Minors
		Work Permits
		Coogan’s Law
		Parents, Guardians, Teachers and Schooling
		Working Hours
		Miscellaneous Guidelines Pertaining to Minors
		Specific California Guidelines
	Taft/Hartley
	Nudity
	Work in Smoke
	SAG Background Actors
	Additionally
	Forms in This Chapter
	Screen Actors Guild Offices
Chapter 13: Background Talent
	Background Casting Agencies
		Finding Specific Types
	The Process
		Gathering Large Crowds and Filling Stadiums
	Background Casting on Location
	Specifically SAG
		Moving from Nonunion to Union Status
	With the Extra in Mind
		Reminder of Professional Conduct for Background Actors
	Forms in This Chapter
Chapter 14: There's An Animal In My Film
	Introduction
	The Process
		Shipping Animals
		Animal Trainers
	Some Expert Advice
	The American Humane Association
Chapter 15: Clearances and Releases
	Introduction
	What Needs to Be Cleared
		Likeness
		Crowd Notice
		Locations
		Name
		Names of Actual Businesses or Organizatio ns
		Telephone Numbers
		License Plates
		Depiction of Public Authorities
		Street Addresses
		Depiction of Actual Products
		Posters and Paintings
		Publications
		Currency
		Web Addresses
		Music
	Product Placement
	Guidelines for the Use of Clips, Stills and News Footage in Multimedia Programs
		Literary Works
		News and/or Stock Footage
		Film Clips
		Television Clips
		Still Photos
		Public Domain Films and Stills
		Trailers
		Talent Clearance
			News Footage
				Public Figures in News Footage
			Feature Films
			Television Programs
		Directors and Writers Payments
	Distribution of Release Forms
	Forms in This Chapter
Chapter 16: A Guide to Music Clearance
	What Is Music Clearance?
	Why Does a Producer Have to Secure Licenses for "Music Rights"?
	How Does Your Errors and Omission Insurance Policy Relate to Music Clearance?
		Who Are the Owners of Musical Compositions and Recordings?
	What Was the U.S. Supreme Court's Rear Window Decision and How Does It Affect Music Licensing?
	What Rights Are Needed in Order to Make Sure that the Musical Material Used in a Production Is Properly Cleared?
		Public Performing Rights
		Reproduction Rights
		Adaptation Rights
	From Whom Are These Music Rights Obtained?
		Musical Compositions
		Recordings
	What Is a Music Cue Sheet and Why Is It So Important?
	To Where Should Music Cue Sheets Be Sent?
	Can a Copyright Owner Prevent Music from Being Used?
	What Happens If a Song Is Used Without Clearance?
	What About Old Songs? Aren't These Songs in the Public Domain, and Free to Be Used Without Restrictions?
	How Long Can Music Be Protected by Copyright?
	May I Use Eight Bars of a Song Without Paying for It?
	What Is "Fair Use"?
	May the Title of a Song Be Used as the Title of a Program?
	Must a License Be Secured if Song Lyrics Are Spoken in Dialogue?
	May Lyrics to an Existing Song Be Changed Without Permission?
	If a Song Is Cleared for One Episode of a Television Series, May It Be Used in Other Episodes Without Additional Permission?
	Is It Necessary to Clear Music that's to Be Used in Commercials?
	May Records or Compact Discs Be Used on a Television Show?
	If a License Is Obtained to Use a Film Clip from a Television Program or Feature Film, Will that License Include the Right to use the music contained on the clip?
	If a Record Company Issues a License to Use a Music Video Clip, Will Further Clearances Be Required?
	Is a Synchronization License Required for the First U.S. Network Broadcast of an Original Live or Taped Television Program?
	What Rights Are Required to Release a Program for Sale in the Home Video/DVD Marketplace?
	What Do Music Copyright Owners Charge for Home Video/DVD Rights?
	How Are Feature Films Licensed?
	How Is Music Licensed in Religious Programs?
	How Much Will It Cost to Clear a Song for Use in My Television or Film Project?
	What Is a Needle Drop?
	What Happens When Licenses Expire?
Chapter 17: Safety
	Safety Programs
	Safety Meetings
	Safety Training
	Designated Areas of Responsibility
	Safety Bulletins
		General Code of Safe Practices for Production
			Procedural Guidelines
	General Safety Guidelines for Production
		General Rules
		Lifting and Moving
		Common Fall Risks (Catwalks,Runways, Floor Openings, Guard Rails, Scaffolds and Stairwells)
		Hazardous Materials
		Hand Tools and Related Equipment
		Filming Equipment (Booms, Camera and Insert Cars, Cranes, Dollies, etc.)
		Filming Vehicles (Aircraft, Helicopters, Cars, Trains, etc.)
		Electrical Safety
		Water Hazards
		Stunts and Special Effects
		Smoke
		Firearms
		Animals
		Environmental Concerns
		Preparing for an Emergency
	Screen Actors Guild - Safety Regulations
	Working Under Hazardous Conditions
	Advice from an Expert
	Sexual Harassment
	"On Location" - Personal Safety Considerations and Suggestions
		Visit Locations Prior to First Day of  Shooting
		Gang-Occupied Locations
		Additional Suggestions
		Taking Action
		Conflict Resolution
		Self-Defense
	Forms in This Chapter
Chapter 18: Locations
	Introduction
	The Location Manager
	Filmmaker's Code of Conduct
	Sample Notification Letter
	Forms in This Chapter
Chapter 19: Distant Location
	Introduction
	Location Managers on Distant Location
	The Production Office
		The Traveling Production Office
	Distant Location Checklist
	Welcome to Location
	Interacting with Local Communities
	Film Commissions
	SAG Branch Offices
	Form in This Chapter
Chapter 20: Foreign Locations
	Introduction
	U.S. Companies Shooting in Foreign Countries
		Before You Make Your Plane Reservations
		Supplying Information to Cast and Crew
		Instructions for Crossing into a Foreign Country
		The U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA)
			Final Notes
	The United States as a Foreign Location
		O Visas
		P Visas
		H-2B Visas
Chapter 21: Travel and Housing
	Introduction
	Travel Considerations
		General Travel Information
		Movement Lists and Individual Travel Itineraries
	Housing
		There’s Always Someone
		Alternative Housing
	Forms in This Chapter
Chapter 22: Shipping
	Introduction
	Shipping Companies
	Shipping Coordination
	General Shipping Guidelines
		Dangerours Goods
		Modes of Transportation
			Ground
			Air
			Ocean
	Domestic Shipping
		Manifests
		Packing and Labeling
		Shipping Dailies
		Weapons, Ammunition, and Explosives
		Shipping Animals
		Returns
			Personal Items
			Sea Containers and Rolling Stock
			Rolling Stock
	International Shipping
		General Customs and Shipping Guidelines
			Weapons
		Temporary versus Definite
		Brokers and Freight Forwarders
		Methods of Importing Goods on a Temporary Basis
			Carnets
			Certificate of Registration
			Pro-Forma Shipping Invoices
			Temporary Importation Bonds (TIBs)
			In-Bond
			Shipper Export Declaration
		Transporting Goods Across the Border
		Fees
		Packing and Labeling International Shipments
		Providing Information to Vendors
		Returns
		Film and Dailies on a Foreign Location
		U.S. Sales Tax Exemptions
		Final Notes
	Forms in This Chapter
Chapter 23: Effects
	Introduction
	Visual Effects
	Physical Effects
	Mechanical Effects
Chapter 24: Specifically Television
	Introduction
	Showrunners
	TV Directors
	Cable Movies
	The One-Hour Drama
		Overview
		Airdates
		Titles
		A Prep Schedule
		Budgets
		The Cast
		The HD Factor
		Some Differences Between Broadcast Network and Cable Shows
	Reality TV
		Reality as a Genre
		Casting
		Insurance Considerations
		Product Placement
		Staff and Crew
		Post Production
		Summing It Up
	Half-Hour Sitcoms
Chapter 25: Independent Filmmaking
	Introduction
	Specialty Divisions
	So You're Going to Make a Film
		For Starters
		Rights
		Completion Bonds
	From Financing to Distribution
		A Business Plan
		Financing Models
		Bank Loan
		About Sales Agents
		Producer’s Reps
		Distribution
		Acquisition Executives
	Some Additional Resources
Chapter 26: Practical Low-Budget Filmmaking
	Introduction
	General Suggestions for Low- and Ultra-Low-Budget Films
	Filming on a Shoestring
		What Is It?
		How Does It Work?
		What to Include in the Proposal
		Some Very Important Notes
	Short Films
	Marrying Creativity with Business
	Film Festivals
	Direct-to-DVD
	Documentaries
	More on Marketing
	Music for Your Film
	Additional Resources
	Forms in This Chapter
Chapter 27: New Media
	Introduction
	What Is New Media?
	Cross-Platforms
	Studios and Networks
	New Media Producers, Studios and Production Companies
	Games
	Special Venues
	Interactive TV
	Marketing in the Digital Age
	Where to Go for More
	A Little Terminology
	Website Resources
	Conferences
	Final Thoughts
Chapter 28: Commercial Production
	Introduction
	Developing, Bidding and Awarding
	The Pre-Production Book
	The Relationship Between the Client, the Agency and the Production Company
	Differences
	The Wrap Book
	Forms in This Chapter
Chapter 29: Wrap
	Introduction
	Recoverable Assets
	Getting Started
	Tentative Screen Credits
	At the Completion of Principal Photography
	Short Ends
	Wrapping by Department
		Wardrobe
		Props
		Set Dressing
		Set Dressing/Construction
		Art Department/Construction
		Construction
	Packing
	To Submit to Your Production Exec or Parent Company
	Your Basic Wrap Book
	Wrap Checklist
		The Final Production Book
	Forms in This Chapter
Chapter 30: Post Production Overview
	Introduction
	Shooting on Film
		The Process
	Shooting Digitally
	Editing
	The Director's Cut
		Under the DGA Basic Agreement
		Under a DGA Low-Budget Agreement
	Dailies
	Post Production Sound
	Schedules and Workflow
	Screen Credits
		Directors Guild of America (DGA)
			Director – Theatrical Motion Pictures
			Director – Television
			Unit Production Manager/First Assistant Director/Second Assistant Director – Theatrical Motion Pictures and Television
		Screen Actors Guild (SAG)
			Performers – Theatrical Motion Pictures
			Performers – Television Motion Pictures
		Writers Guild of America (WGA)
			Writers – Theatrical and Television Credits
		Other Significant Screen Credits
			Producers’ Credits
			Casting
			Music
			Film Editor
			Art Director/Production Designer
			Director of Photography
			Costume Designer
			Set Decorator
			Costumers
			Hair and Make-Up
		Alternative Titles
		Sample Screen Credits
	Standard Delivery Requirements
		Negative and Picture Elements
		Sound Elements
		Videotape Masters
		Publicity Materials
		Music Documents
		General Documents
		Work Materials
	Post Production Terminology
		Film Terms Translated to Their Digital Equivalent
Chapter 31: Greener Filmmaking
	Introduction
	General Guidelines
		Recycle!
		Conserve Energy!
		Be Environmentally Responsible!
		Properly Dispose of Hazardous Waste!
	Departmental Guidelines
		The Production Office
		Construction
		Transportation
		On-Set
		Craft Service/Catering
		Grip and Electric
		Special Effects
		Wardrobe
		Make-Up and Hair
		Camera
	What Can Be Recycled
		Paper
		Metals
		Glass
		Plastics
		Do Not Recycle These Items
	Green Guidelines
	Green Links
Chapter 32: Industry Survival Tips
	Introduction
	Key Ingredients to a Successful Career
		#1: Passion! Passion! And More Passion!
		#2: Being Prepared
		#3: It’s Who You Know and Who Knows You
		#4: It’s Also What You Know About the Industry
		#5: Understanding the Power of Networking
		#6: Having a Plan, and Committing to Your Success
		#7: Standing Out from the Crowd
		#8: Developing a Thick Skin
		#9: Perfecting Your Craft
		#10: Having Good Interview Skills
		#11: Being Able to Ask for What You Want
		#12: A Winning Attitude
		#13: A Willingness and an Ability to Play the Game
		#14: Being Well Liked and Having a Good Reputation
		#15: A Game Plan for Getting Through the Rough Times
		#16: The Seven Ps
	More on Getting Through the Tough Times
	Getting Work
	Developing Good Work Habits and Necessary People Skills
	A Lesson in Paying Dues
	It's the Attitude, Dummy
	How to Keep Learning
	Easier Said than Done
	Remembering Why You Got into This Business to Begin With
Glossary of Terms
Index
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INSTRUCTIONS

(After reading the following, if you have any further questions, please call 213/549-6644.) (For your convenience, our fax
number is 213/549-6647.)

1. Indicate the name of the signatory Production Company (e.g., “THE ABC COMPANY”).

2. Indicate the quarter/year when principal photography was completed (e.g., “1st quarter 1981”). Make one report only for
full project even though it might span more than one quarter.

The quarters consist of: January - March (1st)
April - June (2nd)
July - September (3rd)
October - December (4th)

3. Indicate the name of the film for which you are reporting.

4. Indicate the type of project (feature, television movie, television pilot, television series, animation.

5. Use a number to respond to this question.

6. Indicate the name of person completing this form and the telephone number for same.

7. Two separate reports are required, one for Performers only and one for Stunt Performers only. If there were no Stunt
Performers employed on the film, check the “No Stunt” box. If Stunt Performers were employed, complete the casting data
report form for Stunt Performers.

8. Part I. Indicate the total number of lead and supporting Performers in each of the applicable categories. Series performers
column is provided for episodic TV shows only. Daily column is for daily contract & 3-day contract performers only. Weekly
column is for weekly contract and run-of-the-picture performers. A day contract performer upgraded to a weekly contract
performer in a drop/pick-up situation should be listed in the weekly column (do not count the performer twice).

9. Use numbers only to indicate the total number of Performers in the category.

10. Use numbers only to indicate the total number of days worked by ALL Performers in the category. (Include all days paid for
including hold, rehearsal days, etc.)

11. Use numbers only to indicate how many Performers were in each age group.

12. Part II. Indicate the total number of males and females in each category.

13. Use number only to indicate the total number of days worked by ALL the Performers in male and female category.

14. Use numbers only to indicate how many Performers were in each age group.

**NOTE: PLEASE MAKE EVERY EFFORT TO INSURE THAT YOUR NUMBERS CORRESPOND ACROSS AND AMONG
PART I AND PART II.**

254 The Complete Film Production Handbook

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