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TitleThe Architecture of Community
PublisherIsland Press
ISBN 139781597265782
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size80.3 MB
Total Pages487
Table of Contents
                            Author's Note
Table of Contents
Foreword by Robert A.M. Stern
Preface: The Art of Making Places
Chapter I: Aspects of Modernity
	Introduction
	Contemporary Prospects
	From Political Pluralism to Architectural Plurality
	The Authority of the Architects in a Democracy
	Towards a Coexistence of Doctrines
	The Architect's Categorical Imperative
Chapter II: Nature of the Architectural Object
	Res Publica * Res Privata
	Nameable Objects and So-Called Objects
	Definition of the Architectural Object
	True and False Monuments
	Technology and Architectural Expression
	Summary of Terms and Concepts
Chapter III: Critique of a Modernist Ideology
	"How to Make the Easy Difficult by Way of the Useless"
	Modernism or the Anticonformism of the Establishment
	Historicism and Modernism
	Modernism and Progress
	The Aporia of Modernism
	Modernism and Experimentalism
	Modernism and Functionalism
	Modernism and Formalism
	Zeitgeist
	Modernism and Memory
	Modernism and Conservation: The Charter of Venice and Docomomo
	After Modernism
	Gained in Translation
Chapter IV: Prospects for a New Urbanism
	Forms of Urban Overexpansion
	Ecology and Urbanism * The Vital Link
	Critique of Industrial Planning and Functional Zoning
	The Urbanization of the Suburbs
	The Need to Reform Development Programs
	The Masterplan, A Definition
	The Masterplan, A Tool of Public Interest
Chapter V: The Polycentric City of Urban Communities
	Cities within the City
	Structural Components
	City and Landscape
	Sustainability
	Structure and Form of the Urban Quarter
	Geometry of Urban Patterns
	Siting of Buildings on Squares, Streets, and Blocks
	Type, Shape, and Character of Urban Spaces
	Single-Lot Blocks * Multi-Lot Blocks and Their Architecture
	Hierarchy of Public Spaces and Circulation Hierarchy
	The Polycentric Zoning of Functions
	Building Heights
	In Praise of Towers
	Critical Problems of Plot-Ratios
	Artificial Lighting of Public Spaces
Chapter VI: Washington, DC: An Unfinished Canvas
	Washington, DC, A Global Ecological Reconstruction
	Rebirth of the America City
	On Classical Architecture and Vernacular Building
Chapter VII: The Modernity of Traditional Architecture
	Traditional Culture and the Idea of Progress
	Architecture and Politics
	Why Architecture Matters to You!
	The Destiny of Traditional Architecture
	The Perennial Values of the Principles of Traditional Architecture
	The New * The Unique * The Tectonic * The Original
	Natural and Synthetic Materials
	Venustas * Firmitas * Utilitas
Chapter VIII: The Universal Usefulness of a Modern Craft Industry or The Fourth Industrial Revolution
	Critique of the Industrialization of Buildings
	The Evaluation of Buildings by Their Whole Life Cycle
	Knowledge or Know-How: The Need for Modern Craftsmanship
Chapter IX: The Architectural Tuning of Settlements
	The Architectural Tuning of Settlements
Chapter X: Drawing to Reality
	Why I Practice Classical Architecture and Traditional Urbanism
	Sculpture Podium, Barcelona, Spain
	Tower Block Renovation, Alessandria, Italy
	Archeological Museum, Sintra, Portugal
	The Seaside Prize
	Robert Davis Laudatio
	Krier Hosue, Seaside, Florida, USA
	Cittá Nuova, Alessandria, Italy
	Windsor Village Hall, Vero Beach, Florida, USA
	Brasserie Agape, Val D'Europe, France
	The Jorge M. Perez Architecture Center, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida, USA
	The Richard H. Driehaus Prize for Classical Architecture
	Jaque Robertson Laudatio
	Hameau-Des-Pins, Hardelot, France
	Poundbury, Dorchester, Dorset, UK
Afterwords
	Conclusion
	The Last Word by James Howard Kunstler
	Index
	Photo Credits
	Author's Biography
	Other Publications
	Editors' Biographies
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 243

T H E A R C H I T E C T U R E O F C O M M U N I T Y

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CAPITOL TOWN will be the largest division of Federal City. Some 20,000 to 30,000 peo-
ple could live in this hill town in four-story high buildings and on spacious tree-lined ave-
nues. The intimate squares in front of public buildings would increase their monumentality.
Thus the square of the Supreme Court would have approximately the size of the Republican
Forum in Rome; an adequate setting for the most Roman of Washington’s monuments. Con-
stitution Square on the other hand, a national square in size and character, is dug into the
fl anks of the Hill and dominated by the west front of the Capitol building. The facades carry
large granite plaques with the texts of the Constitution of the United States and on inaugu-
ration day the square will hold 200,000 spectators. The east elevation of the Capitol is one
of the most remarkable compositions in the world. The west facade, however, as viewed from
the Mall, is a shapeless lump with its cupola fl oating like a dish on too broad a tabletop.

By planting dense rows of cypress trees into the lateral recesses, the buildings are articulated into
three distinct pavilions: the Senate Chamber, the Great Rotunda, and the House Chamber. The
twelve meter high pyramidial perron, rising from Constitution Square to the open exedra, reinforces
the verticality of the central composition, which will form the focus of the Grand Canal. The two
acroteral pyramidions will solidly ameliorate the cupola to its base. Also proposed are detailed im-
provements to the west portico, contributing to the current debate about its envisaged remodeling.

I. THE CAPITOL
II. SUPREME COURT
III. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
IV. UNION STATION
V. US BOTANIC GARDEN
VI. GRANT MEMORIAL

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