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TitleStudies in Tectonic Culture: The Poetics of Construction in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Architecture
PublisherMIT Press
ISBN 139780262561495
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size28.7 MB
Total Pages447
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Studies in Tectonic Culture

Page 2

Kenneth Frampton

edited by John Cava

Page 223

rf]

6.74

Mies van der Rohe, Neue Nationaigalerie, typi¬

cal section.

6.75

Mies van der Rohe, Neue Nationaigalerie, col¬

umn elevation and plan.

6.76

Mies van der Rohe, Museum for a Small City,

project, 1943.

concern for cultural continuity and the permanence of material. The continuous

travertine floor in the Farnsworth House is a case in point, for while it covers the

entire floor, including the bathroom, it is countered in its materiality by the ab¬

stract immateriality of the suspended ceiling. At the same time Mies, like Louis

Kahn, was drawn to the sublime, not only in terms of light and space but also in
s :
a temporal sense, so that, after the Schinkelschule by which he was influenced,

’F i,„
his works aspired to a state of eventual ruination. This romantic prospect al¬

ready finds reflection in the habitual planting of ivy against the pristine eleva¬

tions of his buildings. Thus his concern for the precision of tectonic form was

always tempered, not only by the infinite space field of the avant-garde and the

dematerialized membrane but also by the ever-changing fateful forces of tech¬

nology and time. By accepting the triumph of universal technology and by

concentrating as a result on the “how” of technique rather than the “what” of in¬

stitutional form, Mies strove to liberate the subject from the pathos of its insig¬

nificance when set against the flood tide of modernization. Like others of his

generation, like Max Weber, Ernst Junger, and Martin Heidegger and above all

like the church architect Rudolf Schwarz, by whom he was directly influenced,

Mies recognized modern technology as a dichotomous destiny that was at

once both destroyer and provider. He saw it as the apocalyptic demiurge of the

new era and as the inescapable matrix of the modern world. It was this that

prompted him to shift the focus of architecture toward technique and away from

type and space form, always assuming that the latter would be spontaneously

fulfilled, either through the limitless freedom of the open plan or through the

changing subdivision of cellular space. Within these parameters, the art of build¬

ing for Mies meant the embodiment of the spirit in the banality of the real; the

spiritualization of technique through tectonic form.

207

Page 446

Kuwait parliament building, 294-296; figs. 8.80-8.84
Langelinie Pavilion, 255, 259-260. 284; figs. 8.16, 8.18
London Crystal Palace competition, 251; fig. 8.5
and Mexican architecture. 248, 254-255, 268; fig. 8.10
and Middle Eastern architecture, 264, 293
and Mies van der Rohe, 253
Morocco paper mill, 253; fig. 8.7
Odense new quarter, 261, 264, 267; fig. 8.30
and shipyards, 250-251
shopping center, 268; fig. 8.39
Silkeborg Museum, 259-261,268-269; figs. 8.19. 8,22
skanske hustyper, 262
Svaneke Seamark watertower, 255
Sydney Opera House, 251,259, 261.268, 271,273, 275-285, 291,

292, 296, 297-298; figs. 8.53-8.58, 8.60-8.67
World Exhibition Center. 268; fig. 8.34
and Wright, 253
Zurich Opera House, 261,271-273, 283, 291; figs. 8.48-8.52

Utzon, Lin, 290

Vacchini, Livio, and Alberto Tibiletti
Macconi Building, 372; fig. 10.52

Valery, Paul, 154, 249
Valle, Gino and Nani, 360

bank, 364
Casa Quaglia, 364
Zanussi Rex, 364-365; fig. 10.42

Van de Velde, Henri
Werkbund Theatre, 135

Van de Ven, Cornelis
Space in Architecture, 1

Van Doesburg, Theo
Cafe Aubette, 302; fig. 9.5

Van Eyck, Aldo, 287, 347-348
Vattimo, Gianni

The End of Modernity, 25
Venturi, Robert, 377
Vesica piscis, 312-314
Viani, Alberto, 312
Vico, Giambattista, 13, 24, 307
Scienza nuova, 10

Viollet-le-Duc, Eugene-Emmanuel, 40, 41,48, 50, 51,55, 56, 59, 83,
123, 143, 155, 160, 195, 204, 211,213, 214, 215, 217, 226, 233,
243, 247, 248, 273, 336, 337, 350

Dictionnaire raisonne, 49, 53-54, 152
Entretiens sur Tarchitecture, 1,49, 54, 57
Notre-Dame de Paris, 48
3,000-seat hall, 51-52; figs. 2.24, 2.25

Wachsmann, Konrad, 335, 354; fig. 10.31
Wagner, Otto, 84, 89, 90, 91,346, 372

Nussdorf and Kaiserbad dams, 342-343; figs, 10.10, 10.11
Postsparkassenamt, 340, 342, 345, 361; fig. 10.7
St. Leopold Church, 342; figs. 10.8, 10.9
Zeile Viaduct, 342

Wagner, Richard, 93
Walther, Ernst, 167
Weber, Max, 207
Weinbrenner, Friedrich, 75
Weisse, Christian, 82
Westminster Abbey, chapel of Henry VII, 38
Westwood, J. O., 97
Wiegmann, Rudolf, 67
Williams, Amancio, 360
Williams, E. Owen, 335
Boots plant, 336; fig. 10.2

Willis, Robert, 34
Winckelmann, J. J., 61, 87
Winslow, W. H., 110
Wittkower, Rudolf, 232
Wren, Christopher
St. Paul's cathedral. 38, 39, 40
Sheldonian Theatre, 40

Wright, Frank Lloyd, 93-120, 123, 228, 247, 253, 267, 284, 285, 287
Barnsdall house, 107
Beth Shalom Synagogue, 120
Broadacre City, 120; fig. 4.31
Harry Brown house, 107; fig. 4.13
Coonley house. 107; fig. 4.14
The Disappearing City, 120
Fallingwater, 120
Forest Style, 114
Freeman house, 110, 113
A. D. German Warehouse, 107
Gerts cottages, 102; figs. 4.9, 4.10
Glasner house, 102
Guggenheim Museum, 120, 260; fig. 8.20
Heurtley house, 102; fig. 4.11
Hollyhock House, 107
Imperial Hotel, 107
Herbert Jacobs house. 116, 120; fig. 4.28
Albert Johnson house, 107
S. C. Johnson Administration Building, 111, 117, 120, 229, 284; figs.

4.23, 4.29, 4.30
S. C. Johnson Research Tower, 113, 145, 259; figs. 4.29, 4.30, 8.17
Richard Lloyd Jones house, 113; figs. 4.24-4.26
La Miniatura, 107, 109; fig. 4.16
Larkin Building, 117, 229, 350-351,353; fig. 7.20
Luxfer Prism office project, 110
Midway Gardens, 107, 271; fig. 4.15
National Life Insurance Offices, 110, 111, 117; figs. 4.20-4.22
River Forest Golf Club, 102
Romeo and Juliet Windmill, 102; fig. 4.8
Ross house, 102
Samuel Freeman house, 117; fig. 4.19
San Francisco Call Tower, 113
San Marcos in the Desert, 109; fig. 4.18
Gordon Strong Automobile Objective and Planetarium, 260; fig. 8.21
Unity Temple, 106, 107, 284-285, 289; fig. 8.68
Usonian houses, 103, 114, 116, 117, 120, 254, 262-264; fig, 4.27
Village Bank, 106; fig. 4.12
Malcolm Willey house, 114

Xenakis, Iannis, 346

Zehrfuss, Bernard
UNESCO headquarters, 268

430

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