Download Neoliberalism and Global Cinema: Capital, Culture, and Marxist Critique (Routledge Advances in Film Studies) PDF

TitleNeoliberalism and Global Cinema: Capital, Culture, and Marxist Critique (Routledge Advances in Film Studies)
PublisherRoutledge
ISBN 139780203813638
CategoryArts - Film
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size3.3 MB
Total Pages371
Table of Contents
                            Title
Copyright
Contents
Figures
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Neoliberalism and Global Cinema: Subjectivities, Publics, and New Forms of Resistance
Part I: Hollywood and Global Dominance
	1 “For a Better Deal, Harass Your Governor!”: Neoliberalism and Hollywood
	2 A Legacy of Neoliberalism: Patterns in Media Conglomeration
	3 Twenty-first Century Neoliberal Man
Part II: Latin America
	4 Cuban Cinema: A Case of Accelerated Underdevelopment
	5 Politics and Privatization in Peruvian Cinema: Grupo Chaski’s Aesthetics of Survival
	6 Form, Politics, and Culture: A Case Study of The Take, The Revolution Will Not Be Televised, and Listen to Venezuela
Part III: Asia
	7 Market Socialism and Its Discontent*: Jia Zhangke’s Cinematic Narrative of China’s Transition in the Age of Global Capital
	8 “Leitmotif”: State, Market, and Postsocialist Film Industry under Neoliberal Globalization
	9 From Exploitation to Playful Exploits: The Rise of Collectives and the Redefinition of Labor, Life, and Representation in Neoliberal Japan
	10 The Underdevelopment of Development: Neoliberalism and the Crisis of Bourgeois Individualism
	11 Fragments of Labor: Neoliberal Attitudes and Architectures in Contemporary South Korean Cinema
	12 Mainlandization and Neoliberalism with Postcolonial and Chinese Characteristics: Challenges for the Hong Kong Film Industry
	13 Neoliberalism and Authoritarianism in Singaporean Cinema: A Case Study of Perth
	14 Gambling on Life and Death: Neoliberal Rationality and the Films of Jeffrey Jeturian
Part IV: Africa and Europe
	15 Nollywood in Lagos, Lagos in Nollywood Films
	16 French Cinema: Counter-Model, Cultural Exception, Resistances
Contributors
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

Neoliberalism
and Global Cinema

Page 185

170 Ying Xiao

River,” would, on the one hand, readily remind viewers of its American coun-
terpart—another version of the unfulfi lled and tragic love story on the ocean;
on the other, the underlying text of “Yellow River,” an embodiment of Chi-
nese civilization, with its sharp contrast to the blue ocean, a unique symbol of
Western culture in the Chinese imaginary, would furthermore assist its audi-
ences to identify the fi lm as a Chinese version of Titanic that accommodates at
once the rhetorics of Hollywood global fl ow and the localized fl avor.

In this regard, Grief over the Yellow River seems to be a visual
comment on how Hollywood mega-productions penetrate the Chinese

Figures 8.1–8.4 DVD covers and fi lm posters of Grief over the Yellow River.

Page 186

“Leitmotif” 171

popular consciousness and reappear as hybrid coherent entities in the
postsocialist context. Enjoying the widest release and earning phenom-
enal critical acclaims across the nation,24 this fi lm together with Feng
Xiaoning’s previous hit Red River Valley shall be considered as the
“China-produced big pictures” or “Chinese blockbusters” that may fi t
into Chris Berry’s account. Not only do they belong to this designation
by virtue of their “bigness”—big budgets,25 big stars,26 big effects,27 big
publicity, big box-offi ce return, but also they are in response to and dia-
logue with Hollywood fi lms with similar themes. In an interview with
one of the most widely circulated fi lm journals, Popular Cinema, Feng
Xiaoning explains:

At the end of 1995 when Chinese fi lm industry suffered from a great
depression, the major concerns of offi cials in Shanghai Film Studio
was not only constrained by profi t-seeking, but more importantly the
experiments that purport to stimulate fi lm market through big in-
vestments with prime artistic qualities has ushered in a new model of
blockbuster of our own. All these factors have considerably contrib-
uted to the success of Red River Valley.28

Figures 8.5 and 8.6 DVD cover and fi lm poster of Titanic, directed by James Cam-
eron, 1997.

Page 370

Index 355

Oil 32, 51; Lagos oil boom, 318, 319,
321; Venezuelan economy, 119,
128

Okome, Onookome, 314, 323, 326,
327

Oldboy, 12, 217, 218, 219, 220, 222,
223, 231, 232, 233, 237, 238

Obama, Barack, 38, 54, 66

P
Park Chan-Wook, 5, 12, 217, 218, 220,

223, 225
Pavón, Luis, 92
Patriarchy, 10, 206, 212; bourgeois,

198; white; 8, 59, 60, 62
Pentagon, 4, 23, 28, 29, 37, 25, 27
Pfaff, Francoise, 317, 318, 323,324,

327
Pila Balde /Fetch a Pail of Water, 13,

14, 279–292, 298–303
pito-pito, 280–85, 297, 301
Political economy, 4, 6, 12, 14, 56, 71,

179, 237–7, 260; critique of,
220, 221; of cinema, 333; of
neoliberalism, 1, 191, 200; of
Star Trek, 71, 72

Postmodernism, 5, 75, 219
Postmodernity 35, 178, 223, 237, 260
Precariat 183–84, 86, 194–5
Privatization, 2, 21, 29, 69, 95, 106,

149, 151, 193, 219, 259; in
China, 175; of public space, 187

Propaganda, 3, 23, 25–6, 28, 79, 81,
83–5, 113, 143, 158, 161, 168,
174, 175, 177, 318

Psychoanalysis; bourgeois as classic
subject of, 202; and post-femi-
nism, 64

Publics, 32, public sphere, 4, 9–10, 14,
60, 80, 85, 91–2, 113, 230, 280,
317; Western, 114

Purcell, Mark, 242, 257, 260

R
Race, 71–2 318
Rancière, Jacques, 191–2, 195–6, 337

S
Sadism, 211, 230
Saludos Amigos, 26
Sanjinés, Jorge , 97
Seoul, 217, 220, 223, 224, 225, 227,

230, 231, 232, 233, 234
Simón Bolívar, 26

Singh, Randhir, 15–16, 200–01, 213,
216

Smith, Adam, 19
Soap operas, 316
Socialism, 2, 15–16, 92, 216; Market

socialism, 11, 152, 167, 178;
state socialism, 340

Social Movements, 4, 114–16, 130–31,
227; women and, 98; weakened
by capitalism, 227

Solanas, Fernando, 131
Space; cinema and 6, 165, 230, 292,

317; and class, 289; cyberspace,
9, 93; global, 6, 13; public and
private, 4, 117, 313; public
spaces, 10–11, 106, 152, 180,
182, 187, 191–3, 201, 234, 343

Spider-Man 2, 29
Spivak, Gayatri Chakravorty, 192,

195–6,
Star Trek XI, 8, 59–62, 66–8, 71–5;

Franchise, 29, 48, 56
Stock Market, 182, 282
Subjectivity, 12, 35, 136, 146; bour-

geois, 198, 206, 211; entrepre-
neurial, 299

Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, 12,
217–19, 223–31, 238

Synergy, 8, 45, 46, 48, 49, 50, 52, 176,
230

Surveillance, 88, 182, 187, 191, 233,
258

T
Taro Aso, 186
Takiji Kobayashi, 183
Tanaka Hiroyuki, 11, 183–4
Technology, 27–8, 36, 51–2, 55, 265,

276, 302; new media technolo-
gies, 40, 88, 312; Digital tech-
nologies, 106–7, 145–6, 148,
194; of simulation, 28–9, 36

Television, 6, 9, 10, 19, 22–24, 27, 29,
30, 127, 321, 333; Cuban, 80–1,
84, 89–94; Industries, 39–46,
48–50, 53, 55–60, 240, 250,
252, 258; Nigerian video and,
316, 320, 327; Peruvian, 95,
102, 107; Philippine television,
282; Star Trek series 68, 71, 74;
Vive TV, 121; privatization of,
329

Telenovelas, 316, 319
Thatcher, Margaret, 2, 65, 75, 263

Page 371

356 Index

The Take, 10, 113–14, 116–18
The Three Caballeros, 26
Tiananmen, 135, 137, 140, 145, 164,

176
Third cinema, 4, 9–10, 126, 128, 131–32

U
Underdevelopment, 12, 200; acceler-

ated, 9, 82; Socialist Underdevel-
opment, 137

Uhura, Nyota, 60–65, 67, 72, 74
Urban/Urbanism, 95, 98, 102, 104,

105, 128, 138, 141, 145, 146,
152, 203, 281, 309, 317; apoca-
lypse, 309; culture, 59, 314;
demolition, 139; migration, 97,
146, 158, 287, 289; renewal,
12, 233, 243, 310; space, 97,
142, 220, 232, 233, 234, 235;
underground, 80

V
Villa del Cine, 121–22

W
Saro-Wiwa, Ken, 320
world cinema, 6, 135, 138, 332, 334
World Trade Organization, 165, 218,

239, 243

X
Xiancheng, 140–44, 146, 154
Xie Jin, 165

Y
Yuki Nakamura, 190, 192, 12

Z
Zhang Yimou, 135,137, 139, 150, 162,

176, 251, 258
Žižek, Slavoj, 91

Similer Documents