Download Movie Journal: The Rise of the New American Cinema, 1959–1971 PDF

TitleMovie Journal: The Rise of the New American Cinema, 1959–1971
PublisherColumbia University Press
ISBN 139780231175579
CategoryArts - Film
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size4.9 MB
Total Pages496
Table of Contents
                            Table of Contents
Foreword: The Great Mr. Mekas, by Peter Bogdanovich
Introduction to the Second Edition, by Gregory Smulewicz-Zucker
Introduction
1. 1959
2. 1960
3. 1961
4. 1962
5. 1963
6. 1964
7. 1965
8. 1966
9. 1967
10. 1968
11. 1969
12. 1970
13. 1971
Afterword by Jonas Mekas
Appendix
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

movie journal

jonas mekas

foreword by
peter bogdanovich

the rise of the new american cinema,
1959-1971

edited, with an introduction, by gregory smulewicz-zucker

second edition

Page 2

movie journal

F I L M A N D C U LT U R E

Page 248

1 9 6 5 � 2 0 9

September 2, 1965

T H E H U M A N B O DY A N D C I N E M A

What is this “pornography,” “obscenity,” “blue movie” business?
The human body, unclad and naked, has been often and uninhibitedly

(or, truer— aesthetically) portrayed in painting and sculpture. It disappears,
sometimes, for a generation or two, and reappears again. It dis appeared,
partially, with the coming of Cubism, during the period of abstract explo-
rations; now it’s coming back. Each time it comes back, it comes as a new
discovery, as if the artist had never seen a naked body in his life. He doesn’t
know how to deal with it aesthetically; subject matter takes over form. Only
slowly the balance is regained, the subject mastered, the ways of dealing
with it aesthetically are found.

Cinema is entering this naked stage for the rst time. The lm artist
did not know how to deal with the naked body so he stayed away from it.
Not that he didn’t really know how to deal with it. There was, apparently,
no real urgency for it. Cinema had its hands full with the exploration of
other aspects and areas of real ity. Cinema was looked at as a basically nat-
uralistic art— and who walks streets naked? So he concentrated all his
lights, all his shadows, lenses, and ingenuity on the only naturalistically
pos si ble open area: the face, with an occasional ankle, or a neck line, or—
daringly!— a leg.

The re nais sance of the poetic cinema during the last few years broke
down the barricades of naturalism. The avant- garde artist, the new poet
mastered new techniques and approaches which now enable him to put on
lm poetically and lmically some of the “untouchable” real ity, including
the body. Against the screams of the majority of the public, the artist pro-
ceeds to reveal to that public (and to himself ) the beauty of the world that
surrounds us. We can safely say now that the rst and perhaps most impor-
tant ground work in this area—in the aesthetic use of human body in cin-
ema has been laid down. It can be seen in the work of Stan Brakhage, Andy
Warhol, Ron Rice, Gregory Markopoulos, Robert Nelson, Jack Smith, Bill
Vehr, Naomi Levine, Barbara Rubin (and, some years earlier, in the work
of Willard Maas). In some of the cases it is being used decoratively, in others
dramatically, in still others phenomenalistically.

Page 249

2 1 0 � 1 9 6 5

Newspapers and magazines, for their own perverted reasons, have often
accused the new cinema of being too preoccupied with “pornography”—
by which they mean the human body. Nakedness in most cases is identi-
ed with pornography. The poetry escapes them. The beauty escapes them.
Venus herself, in cinema, should be clad, they tell us. A culture of penis
without Venus.

The public (and the lm- maker) should not let themselves be distracted
and confused by an irresponsible press. There is a tradition of human body
in art, and our work continues that tradition, although with natu ral and
unaccustomed changes called for by the implicit qualities of the lm me-
dium. Cinema is (or will be) revealing di� er ent aspects of the body from
those sculpture or painting reveal. It is true that cinema doesn’t yet know
all of the aesthetic possibilities of this new subject, in terms of the medium—
but the subject is there. As with every newly discovered subject, there is
much empty and excited running around— but that doesn’t change the his-
torical importance of what’s happening, of what’s going to happen. It’s
part of the larger revolution that is taking place in us.

These artists are working with no real precedent— there are no real mas-
ters to learn from in their own art, as far as the naked body goes— they
are the rst masters. Many mistakes are being committed and all for the
good. Let the gentlemen and ladies scream: It will do them some good, they
have to scream out their own ugliness. Time will pass, like this summer is
passing, and they will call us “classics,” and our children will be amazed
and won der what all that noise was all about.

September 16, 1965

T H E N E W YO R K F I L M F E S T I VA L A S A N E N E M Y
O F T H E N E W C I N E M A

The third New York Film Festival is an or ga nized and well sponsored un-
dertaking to prevent New Yorkers from seeing what’s really going on in
cinema. That’s how it looks to me, despite the good intentions of the people
involved.

Page 495

Taiwan Film Directors: A Trea sure Island
E M I L I E Y U E H -Y U Y E H A N D DA R R E L L

W I L L I A M DAV I S

Shocking Repre sen ta tion: Historical Trauma,
National Cinema, and the Modern Horror Film
A DA M LOW E N ST E I N

China on Screen: Cinema and Nation
C H R I S B E R RY A N D M A RY FA RQ U H A R

The New Eu ro pean Cinema: Redrawing the Map
RO S A L I N D GA LT

George Gallup in Hollywood
S U S A N O H M E R

Electric Sounds: Technological Change and
the Rise of Corporate Mass Media
ST E V E   J . W U RT Z L E R

The Impossible David Lynch
TO D D M C G OWA N

Sentimental Fabulations, Contemporary Chinese
Films: Attachment in the Age of Global
Visibility
R E Y C H OW

Hitchcock’s Romantic Irony
R I C H A R D A L L E N

Intelligence Work: The Politics of American
Documentary
J O N AT H A N K A H A N A

Eye of the Century: Film, Experience, Modernity
F RA N C E S C O C A S E T T I

Shivers Down Your Spine: Cinema, Museums, and
the Immersive View
A L I S O N G R I F F I T H S

Weimar Cinema: An Essential Guide to Classic
Films of the Era
E D I T E D BY N OA H I S E N B E RG

African Film and Lit er a ture: Adapting Vio lence to
the Screen
L I N D I W E D OV E Y

Film, A Sound Art
M I C H E L C H I O N

Film Studies: An Introduction
E D S I KOV

Hollywood Lighting from the Silent Era to Film
Noir
PAT R I C K K E AT I N G

Levinas and the Cinema of Redemption: Time,
Ethics, and the Feminine
S A M   B . G I RG U S

Counter- Archive: Film, the Everyday, and Albert
Kahn’s Archives de la Planète
PAU L A A M A D

Indie: An American Film Culture
M I C H A E L   Z . N E W M A N

Pretty: Film and the Decorative Image
RO S A L I N D GA LT

Film and Ste reo type: A Challenge for Cinema and
Theory
J Ö RG S C H W E I N I T Z

Chinese Women’s Cinema: Transnational Contexts
E D I T E D BY L I N GZ H E N WA N G

Hideous Progeny: Disability, Eugenics, and Classic
Horror Cinema
A N G E L A   M . S M I T H

Hollywood’s Copyright Wars: From Edison to the
Internet
P E T E R D EC H E R N E Y

Electric Dreamland: Amusement Parks, Movies,
and American Modernity
L AU R E N RA B I N OV I T Z

Where Film Meets Philosophy: Godard, Resnais,
and Experiments in Cinematic Thinking
H U N T E R VAU G H A N

The Utopia of Film: Cinema and Its Futures in
Godard, Kluge, and Tahimik
C H R I STO P H E R PAVS E K

Hollywood and Hitler, 1933–1939
T H O M A S D O H E RT Y

Cinematic Appeals: The Experience of New Movie
Technologies
A R I E L RO G E R S

Continental Strangers: German Exile Cinema,
1933–1951
G E R D G E M Ü N D E N

Deathwatch: American Film, Technology, and the
End of Life
C . S C OT T C O M B S

After the Silents: Hollywood Film Music in the
Early Sound Era, 1926–1934
M I C H A E L S LOW I K

Page 496

“It’s the Pictures That Got Small”: Charles
Brackett on Billy Wilder and Hollywood’s
Golden Age
E D I T E D BY A N T H O N Y S L I D E

Plastic Real ity: Special Eff ects, Technology, and
the Emergence of 1970s Blockbuster Aesthetics
J U L I E   A . T U R N O C K

Maya Deren: Incomplete Control
S A RA H K E L L E R

Dreaming of Cinema: Spectatorship, Surrealism,
and the Age of Digital Media
A DA M LOW E N ST E I N

Motion(less) Pictures: The Cinema of Stasis
J U ST I N R E M E S

The Lumière Galaxy: Seven Key Words for the
Cinema to Come
F RA N C E S C O C A S E T T I

The End of Cinema? A Medium in Crisis in the
Digital Age
A N D R É GAU D R E AU LT A N D P H I L I P P E M A R I O N

Studios Before the System: Architecture,
Technology, and the Emergence of
Cinematic Space
B R I A N   R . J AC O B S O N

Impersonal Enunciation, or the Place of Film
C H R I ST I A N M E T Z

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