Download Kieslowski on Kieslowski PDF

TitleKieslowski on Kieslowski
PublisherFaber & Faber
ISBN 139780571167333
CategoryArts - Film
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size46.4 MB
Total Pages289
Table of Contents
                            INTRODUCTION.pdf
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1 BACKGROUND.pdf
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2 THE UNIQUE ROLE OF DOCUMENTARIES.pdf
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3 THE FEATURE FILMS.pdf
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4 'I DON'T LIKE THE WORD "SUCCESS"'.pdf
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5 THREE COLOURS.pdf
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Notes.pdf
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Filmography.pdf
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Index.pdf
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Document Text Contents
Page 1

Edited by
DANUSIA STOK

faber and faber
LONDON BOSTON

Page 2

First published in 1993 by Faber and Faber Limited
3 Queen Square London we I N 3 AU

Photoset by Parker Typesetting Service, Leicester
Printed in England by Clays Ltd, St Ives pic

All rights reserved

@ Krzysztof Kieilowski, 1993
Introduction, translation and editorial commentary @ Danusia Stok, 1993

Krzysztof Kieilowski and Danusia Stok are hereby identified
as authors of this work in accordance with Section 77 of the

Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988.

A CIP record for this book is available from the British Library.

Page 144

THE FEATURE FILMS 125

Communism is like AIDS. That is, you have to die with it. You
can't be cured. And that applies to anyone who's had anything to
do with Communism regardless of what side they were on. It's
irrelevant whether they were Communists or anti-Communists or
entirely uncommitted to either political side. It applies to
everybody. If they've been exposed to the system as long as they
have been in Poland - that is, for forty years - then Communism,
its way of thinking, its way of life, its hierarchy of values, remains
with them and there's no way of expelling it from their system.
They can expel it from their minds, of course, they can say they're
no longer sick. They can even say they've been cured. But it's not
true. It stays inside. It exists, it remains and there's no way of
getting rid of it. It doesn't particularly trouble me. I just know I've
got it and know that I'll die with it, that's all. Not die of it, die with
it. It only disappears when you disappear. The same as AIDS.

W e All Bowed Our Heads
N O E N D ( B E Z KONCA) (1984)

In September or October 1982, at the end of the first half-year of
martial law, I decided to submit several film proposals to the WFD
(State Documentary Film Studios). This was after Station so, to all
intents and purposes, I didn't want to make any more docu-
mentaries but there was no question of making features at the
time.

During martial law I thought I'd make a film about the guys
who paint over graffiti on walls. Everybody was painting all sorts
of graffiti on the walls: against martial law, against J a r ~ z e l s k i , ~ ~
against the Communists, and so on. 'WRON won za Don.' That
was the main one. WRON was the Military Council for the
Salvation of the Nation (Wojskowa Rada Ocalenia Narodowego).
Won is the Russian for fuck off. Za Don means, beyond the River
Don, therefore, get out of Poland. 'WRON won za Don.' There
was graffiti like this and various other kinds, too; caricatures and
so on. The army was fighting this graffiti. Special army or military
brigades were allocated. I don't know who exactly. And I wanted
to make a film called Painter (Malarz), about a boy, a young lad,
who's in the army and paints over graffiti. Because they did paint
over it, or wiped it off, or changed it to something else. They also

Page 145

changed the letters to make them read favourably for the Com-
munists; it was terribly funny, all in all. I thought it would make
an amusing film.

Apart from that idea, I wanted to make a film which would take
place in the law courts. The courts, at that time, were passing
many long sentences for trivial matters. They would pass sentences
of two to three years for painting graffiti, for being caught with an
underground newspaper, for strikes, or any sort of resistance.
Sentences were being handed out to those caught after curfew, that
is, after eight or ten in the evening. So I wanted to make a film
which would take place entirely in the courts and there'd only be
the faces of two people. The accuser and the accused. Meaning,
the film would be about the 'guilty' - 'guilty' in inverted commas
because these people weren't guilty of anything really - and about
the accusers.

I didn't know the legal circle at all. I didn't know anybody. It
was even harder in the early 1980s than in 1970, when we were
working on Workers '71, to persuade anybody to agree to being
filmed because people absolutely loathed Television by then. So I
had to win the trust of people connected with the law.

First of all I had to get an agreement from the authorities. It
took a very long time, about two months. But while we were
sorting out this agreement - and banked on getting it - 1 was
already trying to get through to influential people in this circle;
lawyers mainly, people defending the accused who were later
sentenced to two or three years for trivial matters, for nonsense.
Hania Krall told me that she knew two young lawyers, who were
forever defending people at these trials during martial law. They'd
also acted for the defence before. They'd defended various organ-
izations, including the Workers' Defence Committee (KOR)'3 and
the Confederation of Independent Poland (KPN).'4 She said she
didn't know which one would be better for me but said, 'Try and
meet one of them,' and arranged for me to meet Krzysztof
Piesiewicz. I explained to him what I wanted, what sort of film I
wanted to make. He didn't trust me all that much, to be honest,
but since I'd been recommended by Hania Krall and he'd seen
some of my work somehow I managed to overcome his reluctance.
They were clearly reluctant to allow anybody to note, film or show
any of this at all. I managed to explain to Piesiewicz that I wanted
to defend those who were being sentenced, and to expose those

Page 288

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landmarks of 1980s cinema. The ten hour-long films are all set around the
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marriage, infidelity, faith and compassion.

Dekalog confirms KieGlowski as a master director at the height of his powers.

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Page 289

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