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TitleIntroduction to Residential Layout
PublisherArchitectural Press
ISBN 139780080468617
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size37.1 MB
Total Pages255
Table of Contents
                            Cover
Introduction to Residential Layout
Copyright page
Contents
Preface
Acknowledgements
Photographic sources
Chapter 1. Introduction
	The Design of Residential Areas
	Sustainable Schemes
	Design Choices and Lifestyle Opportunities
	Bland Housing
	Approaches to Residential Layout
	The Structure of each Chapter
Chapter 2. Ensuring commercial viability
	Completing a Development Appraisal
	Working through a Theoretical Example
	The value of Design
	Consumer Preferences
	Issues Influencing the value of a Scheme
	Design and Management Issues Influencing the value of a Scheme
	Use Kerb Appeal
	Further Reading
Chapter 3. Building place and defining space
	Design Places
	Create Urban Form
	Define Space
	Types of Urban Space
	Interfaces
	Fronts and Backs
	Around the Back: Achieving outdoor Privacy and Security
	Around the front a Focus for Public life within the Public Realm
	Provide Surveillance
	Don’t Create Dead Space
	Less Demand for Privacy
	Residential Block Structures
	The Block Structure and Patterns of Access
	The Scale of Streets: Introduce Hierarchy and Spatial Variety
	Limit the use of Buffers
	Ensure a Basic Level of Amenities in Residential Layouts
	Find Light
	Orientate for Direct Sunlight
	Protect Privacy
	Provide Outdoor Space
	Design the Place First
	Further Reading
Chapter 4. Environmentally benign development and design
	Environmental Problems and the Design of Residential Areas
	The Precautionary Principle
	Environmental Sustainability by Design?
	Features of an Environmentally Benign Lifestyle
	Design Good Green Spaces and for Biodiversity
	Design with Density in Mind
	Exploring Tissues
	Favour Environmentally Benign Travel
	Reuse old Buildings and Land
	Watercourses and Sustainable Urban Drainage
	Energy Efficient Residential Forms
	Provide Facilities that allow Residents to Recycle their Waste
	Create Opportunities for Local Food Production
	Further Reading
Chapter 5. Access and movement
	Travel Choice or Prescription
	Think about the Level of Permeability
	Area Accessibility and Scheme Permeability
	Exclusivity or Inclusivity
	Overlapping Networks
	Don’t Compromise Privacy or Surveillance
	Physical and Perceived Access
	Determining the Pattern of Access within the Scheme
	Designing for Modes
	Connecting to Public Transport
	Special Concern for Busier Routes
	Designing for the Cyclist
	Highway types and Dimensions
	Highway types and Networks
	Traffic Calming
	Measures to Achieve Speed Reduction
	Parking
	Further Reading
Chapter 6. Integrating other uses
	Introduction
	What is mixed use?
	Catchments and use Hierarchies
	Getting a Catchment
	The Spatial Distribution of uses
	Mixed use Ambitions
	Schools in Residential Areas
	Studying Building Typologies
	Retaining older Buildings
	Subsidising or Phasing-in other uses
	Anchors
	Catchments and Permeability
	Mixed-use Building Access, Servicing and Sound
	Outdoor Space
	Live/Work
	Other Building types within Residential Areas
	Further Reading
Chapter 7. Safe and easy to find your way around
	Real and Perceived Safety
	Key Concepts for the Design of a Good Environmental Image
	Key Concepts for Designing Safe Residential Layouts
	Approaches to Layout Design to Enhance the Environmental Image
	Approaches to Layout Design to Enhance Feelings of Safety
	Further Reading
Chapter 8. Contemporary residential townscape
	Introduction
	Traditions in Townscape
	Townscape Concepts
	Learning from Townscape Precedents
	Composing a Visual Drama
	Content
	Serial Vision
	Context Character Analysis
	Townscape and way Finding
	Further Reading
Chapter 9. Social life in outdoor residential spaces
	Social Life and Traffic
	Social Life and Urban Form
	Quality vs. Quantity in Residential open space
	Buchanan’s Environmental Areas
	Liveable Streets
	Types of Activity that could be Encouraged
	Designing for young people
	Designing for people who are Elderly
	Approaches to Layout Design
	Home Zones
	Further Reading
Bibliography
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
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INTRODUCTION TO RESIDENTIAL LAYOUT

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114 Introduction to Residential Layout

Figure 5.41 A minor access road

serve up to 400 homes (or 200 homes if they form a cul-de-sac). The width
of the carriageway is 6.75 m. Buildings front these roads, and it is possible
to get direct access off the road into a private business or home. Vehicles
can emerge from neighbouring properties onto this road in reverse gear.
Crossroads for motor vehicles are not typically acceptable, and junctions
are otherwise spaced at 15 m distances. At the junctions the corner radii
need to be 6 m, encouraging slower driving and the viewing distance for
a vehicle approaching the junction needs to be 60 m from a point 2.4 m
from the stop line. Footways of 1.8 m are required on both sides of the
road for pedestrians. Cyclists share the road space and car parking can be
on street.

Minor access road

A minor access road serves 200 homes (or 100 homes if they form a cul-
de-sac) (Figure 5.41). Buildings also front these roads, and it is possible to
get direct access off the road into a private business or home. The width

of the carriageway for vehicles is between 5.5 to 4.8 m with 1.5 m foot-
ways provided on both sides. Vehicles can emerge from neighbouring
properties onto this road in reverse gear. Crossroads for motor vehicles
become acceptable, and there is no minimum distance requirement
between junctions. At the junctions the corner radii need to be 4 m,
encouraging very slow driving and the viewing distance for a vehicle
approaching the junction needs to be 33 m from a point 2 m from the stop
line. Cyclists share the road space and car parking can be on street.

Minor access way

A minor access way serves 50 homes (or 25 homes if they form a cul-de-
sac) and has a design speed of 30 kpm (Figure 5.42). Buildings also front

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Access and movement 115

these roads, and it is possible to get direct access off the road into a pri-
vate business or home. The width of the carriageway for vehicles is 3 m
but with passing places of 4.8 m width at approximately every 40–50 m.
Between passing places a 1.8 m, shared surface footway for pedestrians
should be included. Vehicles can emerge from neighbouring properties
onto this road in reverse gear. Crossroads for motor vehicles are accept-
able, and there is no minimum distance requirement between junctions.
At the junctions the corner radii need to be 4 m encouraging very slow
driving, and the viewing distance for a vehicle approaching the junction
needs to be 33 m from a point 2 m from the stop line. Cyclists share the
road space and car parking can be on street if space is available.

Home zone

A home zone is a residential street where the living environment clearly
predominates over any provision for traffic (Figure 5.43). It is an envi-
ronment where the design of the spaces between homes provides areas
for motor vehicles, but where the wider needs of residents are also fully
accommodated. This is achieved by adopting approaches to street design,
landscaping and highway engineering that control how vehicles move
without restricting the number of vehicular movements.

Figure 5.42 A minor access way

Figure 5.43 A home zone

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Walking, 3, 84–5, 101, 103, 116, 132, 136, 138, 140, 141,
144, 168, 218, 234

Walls, See Boundaries
Waste reduction and recycling, 68, 71, 94
Water:

conservation and management, 68–9, 71, 76,
86–9, 95

sustainable urban drainage, 86–9, 95

Watercolor FL, 35
Wind and residential layout, 69, 76, 89,

91–3, 95
Woonerf:

See Home zones

Young people, designing for, 208–10, 214–20,
229–30

Index 241

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