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TitleIntroduction to Indian Architecture
PublisherPeriplus
ISBN 139781462906420
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size17.4 MB
Total Pages242
Table of Contents
                            Cover
Copyright
Contents
Introduction
Residential Spaces
	Vernacular Architecture
	Elements of Space and Decoration
Architecture and Science
Architecture and Water
	Water Palaces and Pavilions
Early Architecture
The Vaastu Shastra
Sacred Buddhist Spaces
	The Rock-cut Architecture of Ajanta
	Building in the Himalayas
Sacred Hindu Architecture
	Hindu Rock-cut Temples
	The Evolution of the Hindu Temple
The Dravidian Style
	The Pancha Ratha at Mamallapuram
	The Brihadishwara Temple at Thanjavur
	Architecture of the Vijayanagara Dynasty
The Temples of Kerala
Temple Towns of the South
The Nagara Style
	The Sun Temple at Konarak
	The Nagara Style of Central India
	Solanki Architecture
	Hoysala Architecture
	The Terracotta Temples of Bengal
Sacred Jain Architecture
	The Jain Temples of Mount Abu
Sacred Islamic Architecture
	The Evolution of Islamic Styles
	The Sultanate Style
	The Quwwat-ul-lslam Mosque
The Mughal Style
	The Taj Mahal
	Later Mughal Architecture
Provincial Styles
Sacred Sikh Architecture
Secular Spaces: The Fort
Secular Spaces: The Palace
	The Rajput Fort and Palace
	The Gwalior Fort and Palace
	The Red Fort at Delhi
	Palaces of South India
Fatehpur Sikri
Colonial Architecture
	The Colonial Church
	The Colonial Fort
	Commemorative Architecture
	Civic Buildings
	Colonial Bungalows
Indo-Colonial Architecture
	Lutyens' Delhi
Modern Architecture and Le Corbusier
Architecture in India Today
Glossary
Bibliography
Back Cover
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 121

The Keshta Raya Temple, an example of the jor bangla style of roof. Although the exterior form of this twin roof differs
from the simple bangaldar roof, the interior of both is similar in plan. The sanctuary of the Keshta Raya Temple is a 3-
meter-square cell surrounded by side chambers, from one of which a staircase leads to an upper gallery.

Page 122

Sacred Jain Architecture
Jainism was founded in India by Mahavira, about the same time as
Buddhism. For many centuries, Jain art and architecture was barely
distinguishable from the dominant Hindu art and architecture of the times.
Based on the same principles of planning as Hindu shrines, Jain temples
followed the same pattern of evolution, progressing from rock-cut
architecture to freestanding monuments.

The feet of Mahavira Jain, a symbol of worship.

Statue of Adinatha, the first in the line of 24 Jain tirthankaras, in meditation.

Rigidly following the religious tenets of non-violence, Jain communities concentrated on professions
of banking, trade and commerce. By the 11th century, they had prospered enormously, and their
architecture, reflecting their wealth, began to achieve its own distinct expression. Hindu temples
were primarily built out of materials such as granite, quartzite or other stone, locally available. To
the affluent Jains, however, expensive materials were of little consequence and the 11th-century Jain
temples mark the beginning of the use of marble, which was transported, often across long distances,

Page 241

Table of Contents
Cover
Copyright
Contents
Introduction
Residential Spaces

Vernacular Architecture
Elements of Space and Decoration

Architecture and Science
Architecture and Water

Water Palaces and Pavilions
Early Architecture
The Vaastu Shastra
Sacred Buddhist Spaces

The Rock-cut Architecture of Ajanta
Building in the Himalayas

Sacred Hindu Architecture
Hindu Rock-cut Temples
The Evolution of the Hindu Temple

The Dravidian Style
The Pancha Ratha at Mamallapuram
The Brihadishwara Temple at Thanjavur
Architecture of the Vijayanagara Dynasty

The Temples of Kerala
Temple Towns of the South
The Nagara Style

The Sun Temple at Konarak
The Nagara Style of Central India
Solanki Architecture
Hoysala Architecture
The Terracotta Temples of Bengal

Sacred Jain Architecture
The Jain Temples of Mount Abu

Sacred Islamic Architecture
The Evolution of Islamic Styles
The Sultanate Style
The Quwwat-ul-lslam Mosque

The Mughal Style
The Taj Mahal
Later Mughal Architecture

Provincial Styles
Sacred Sikh Architecture
Secular Spaces: The Fort

Page 242

Secular Spaces: The Palace
The Rajput Fort and Palace
The Gwalior Fort and Palace
The Red Fort at Delhi
Palaces of South India

Fatehpur Sikri
Colonial Architecture

The Colonial Church
The Colonial Fort
Commemorative Architecture
Civic Buildings
Colonial Bungalows

Indo-Colonial Architecture
Lutyens' Delhi

Modern Architecture and Le Corbusier
Architecture in India Today
Glossary
Bibliography
Back Cover

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