Download Inside the Film Factory: New Approaches to Russian and Soviet Cinema (Soviet Cinema Series) PDF

TitleInside the Film Factory: New Approaches to Russian and Soviet Cinema (Soviet Cinema Series)
ISBN 139780203992784
CategoryArts - Film
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size11.3 MB
Total Pages281
Table of Contents
                            Book Cover
Half-Title
Title
Copyright
Dedication
Contents
Illustrations
Notes on contributors
Notes on contributions
General editors’ preface
Acknowledgements
Note on transliteration and translation
Introduction Entering the film factory
1 Early Russian cinema: some observations
	RUSSIAN ENDINGS
	THE FIRST RUSSIAN FILM
	THE SPEED OF THE ACTION
	THE INTERTITLE
	FILM RECITATION
	STAGE-SCREEN HYBRIDS
2 Kuleshov’s experiments and the new anthropology of the actor
	I
	II
	III
3 Intolerance and the Soviets: a historical investigation
	I
	II
	PROLOGUE TO INTOLERANCE32
4 The origins of Soviet cinema: a study in industry development
	WAR COMMUNISM AND THE PERIOD OF NET CAPITAL CONSUMPTION
	NEP AND CAPITAL ACCUMULATION
5 Down to earth: Aelita relocated
	1 HAS ANYONE ACTUALLY SEEN AELITA?
	2 ‘ANTA…ODELI…UTA…’
	3 THE MEZHRABPOM-RUS INITIATIVE
	4 TOLSTOI—‘UNLUCKY IN CINEMA’
	5 PROTAZANOV—ON THE THRESHOLD OF A DREAM
	6 PARIS—MOSCOW—MARS
	7 DREAMERS AND DETECTIVES
	8 CREATING THE NEW MAN
	9 BACK THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS
6 The return of the native: Yakov Protazanov and Soviet cinema
7 A face to the shtetl: Soviet Yiddish cinema, 1924–36
8 A fickle man, or portrait of Boris Barnet as a Soviet director
9 Interview with Alexander Medvedkin
10 Making sense of early Soviet sound
	THE THREAT OF THE TALKIES
	CRISIS AND COUNTERPOINT: ANTICIPATING SOUND
	VERTOV: ENTHUSIASM FOR SOUND
	INDUSTRIAL AND CULTURAL REVOLUTION
	FIRST STEPS IN SOUND
		Parapraxes
			1
			2
		Translation
			3
			4
		Miscueing
			5
	FROM ‘INNER SPEECH’ TO ‘OUTER SPEECH’
11 Ideology as mass entertainment: Boris Shumyatsky and Soviet cinema in the 1930s
Notes
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
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Inside the Film Factory

Page 140

society through the works of Protazanov, Vladimir Gardin, Alexander Ivanovsky,

and Cheslav Sabinsky and, of course, their very popularity attested to the vitality

of this taste and culture.

Second, Protazanov kept alive the tradition of the narrative entertainment film,

which in its dramatic and comedic forms enjoyed great public popularity. Even in

the darkest days of the Stalinist era, this tradition was carried on, especially in the

work of Grigori Alexandrov, who much admired Protazanov.68

Third, Protazanov was responsible–along with Fridrikh Ermler, a director of

proletarian origin–for returning the actor to a place of importance in Soviet

cinema; present-day Soviet cinema is known for its exceptional acting talent, not for

its technical innovations. Unlike Ermler, whose pistol was his method of

persuasion on the set, Protazanov was the complete professional, whose skills and

tact have been attested to by a generation of Soviet actors.69

Fourth, Protazanov proved that well-made entertainment films did not require

huge outlays of time and material. Aelita aside, Protazanov’s movies were often held

up to the younger generation as examples of how much an experienced director

could accomplish with very little. Don Diego and Pelageya [1928] was completed in

Figure 14 The classic Ostrovsky play Without a Dowry provided Protazanov with a safe

yet ideal showcase for his talents in 1937.



THE RETURN OF THE NATIVE: YAKOV PROTAZANOV AND SOVIET CINEMA 121

Page 141

three months at a cost of only 40,000 roubles, whereas Vertov’s documentary A

Sixth Part of the World [Shestaya chast’ mira, 1926] had taken nineteen months

and 130,000 roubles.70

Protazanov’s heirs have recognised what many of his contemporaries did not–

that he was a director of the first magnitude. Protazanov has been honoured with

two editions of Aleinikov’s Festschrift, by Arlazorov’s biography, and by favourable

notices in all the standard film histories.71 The attitude of this succeeding

generation towards Protazanov is exemplified by N.M.Zorkaya, who has stated:

Without institutes and surveys, he empathised with the viewer and

unerringly knew what would work on the screen and what the public would

like….

Then, they often complained about the level of his pictures. Oh, if it were

possible to reach the Protazanovian level in all of today’s screen productions!72

Protazanov gave a great deal to Soviet cinema, but the influence was very much

reciprocal. Speculation on what he might have accomplished if he had remained in

the West is beside the point. Back home, Protazanov, though past his first youth,

continued to mature as a director and enjoyed a long and fruitful career in the

movies. Despite the fact that his work was not obviously influenced by the

experiments of his younger contemporaries, I would suggest that the impact of the

ferment of the ‘Golden Age’ of Soviet cinema is visible in his best films and that it

is not coincidental that his outstanding pictures–Don Diego and Pelageya, The

Forty-First and The White Eagle–happened to be those on subjects closely

reflecting the issues and concerns of Soviet society in the 1920s.

122 INSIDE THE FILM FACTORY

Page 280

(Katayev script) 158

Stakhanov, Alexei 154

Stalin, Joseph 53, 62, 79, 136, 158, 181—4,

184, 207, 213, 215—16

Stanislavsky, Konstantin 9—11, 27, 30, 177

Starewicz, Władysław 96

Starving Steppe Revives, The

(Shcherbakov, 1925) 127

Sten, Anna 117, 152

Stenka Razin (Drankov, 1908) 9, 12, 14

Stepanova, Varvara 94

Storm Over Asia (Pudovkin, 1929) 150,

153

Strelkova, Mariya 118

Strike, The (Eisenstein, 1924) 123, 195,

201, 204

Submarine Shipwreck (1911) 26—8

Suburban Quarters (Griger-Cherikover,

1930) 135

Suprematism 82

SVD (Kozintsev and Trauberg, 1927) 137

Symbolism 91, 93, 96, 98

Tailor from Torzhok, The (Protazanov,

1925) 108, 112, 114—20

Tairov, Alexander 45, 82, 93

Tanya Skvortsova the Student (Turkin,

1916) 18

Taras Bulba (Protazanov project) 87

Tarich, Yuri 137

tax on cinema 74—5

Taylor, Richard ix, xii, xviii—4, 61, 182, 191—

216

Taylorism 48, 141, 143

Tears (1914) 19

Teatral’naya gazeta (newspaper) 16

theatre and cinema xviii—49, 178, 200—2

Thiemann and Reinhardt 8, 105—7

Thompson, Kristin 180

Three Millions Trial, The (Protazanov,

1926) 70, 108, 112, 115—20

Three Songs of Lenin (Vertov, 1934) 18

Through Tears (Griger-Cherikover, 1928)

131—5, 135, 141

Tisse, Eduard 41

Tolstoi, Alexei 28, 82—3, 87—91, 97—100, 108

Tolstoy, Lev 19—20, 85, 88, 91, 107

Tommy (Protazanov, 1931) 91, 138, 188

Tractor Drivers, The (Pyriev, 1939) 194,

210—11

Trauberg, Leonid 30, 102, 137, 150—3, 180,

183, 197, 201, 211, 216

Tretyakov, Sergei 117

Tretyakova, Olga 110

Trotsky, Lev 97, 207

Tsar Fyodor Ioannovich (1914) 28

Tsereteli, Nikolai 89, 94, 110

Tsiolkovsky, Konstantin 97

Tsivian, Yuri ix, xi, 5—30

Turkin, Valentin 36, 39—2, 46—8

Two Women (Roshal, 1929) 136

Tynyanov, Yuri 186

Ukraine 93, 104, 123, 125, 127—32, 133, 135—

9, 141—3, 146, 157, 170, 213

Ukrainfilm 144;

see also VUFKU

Vakhtangov Theatre 112

VAPP 109

Vasiliev ‘brothers’ 211

velvet screens, Gardin’s use of 38

Verbitskaya, Anastasiya 106

Vershilov, Boris 127

Vertov, Dziga 79, 85, 87, 101, 102, 121, 153,

175, 181—4, 189, 191, 201—3

Vestnik kinematografii (newspaper) 40

VFKO 35, 66, 68—9

Victory Over the Sun (1913 opera

production) 94

Vilner, Vladimir 128—2, 135, 144

Vishnevsky, Venyamin 4

Viskovsky, Vyacheslav 15

Voitsik, Ada 113

Volga Rebels (Petrov-Bytov, 1925) 127

Volga-Volga (Alexandrov, 1938) 154, 194

Volkonsky, Prince Sergei 31—3, 34—7, 38—

40, 42—5, 46, 48—49

Volkov, Alexander 36

Volpin, Mikhail 154—8

Voznesensky, Alexander 19, 49

Vostokkino 136, 146

VUFKU 123, 127—35, 135—8;

see also Ukrainfilm

INSIDE THE FILM FACTORY 261

Page 281

Wandering Stars (Gricher-Cherikover,

1928) 128—5

War and Peace (Protazanov and Gardin,

1915) 106

War Communism 62—7

Way of the Enthusiasts, The (Okhlopkov

and Medvedkin, 1930) 169

We Don’t Need Blood (Protazanov, 1917)

107

We from Kronstadt (Dzigan, 1936) 147,

194, 211

Wells, H.G. 96—8

Whistle-Stop (Barnet, 1963) 159—3

White Eagle, The (Protazanov, 1928) 108,

112, 116—20, 121

Wilde, Oscar 93

Willemen, Paul 180

Wings of a Serf, The (Tarich, 1926) 120,

127

Without a Dowry (Protazanov, 1937) 120—2

Woman in the Window (Lang, 1944) 91

Workers’ International Relief 70—1, 85—6

Wrestler and the Clown, The (Barnet, 1957)

148, 153, 159

Yampolsky, Mikhail ix, xi, 30—49

Yarmolinsky, Avram 123

Yermoliev (studio) 85, 92, 106—9

Yevsektsiya 123, 126, 134, 136, 146

Yiddish cinema 2, 23, 122—50

Youngblood, Denise x, xi, 102—23

Yutkevich, Sergei 103, 137, 184, 197, 211

Zamyatin, Yevgeni 80, 89, 101, 230 n.81

Zhdanov, Andrei 53, 143

Zhdanov, Yakov 20—1

Zhelyabuzhsky, Yuri 85, 110, 210

Zhizneva, Olga 116

Zorich, Bella 113

Zorkaya, Neya 122

Zuskin, Venyamin 124, 136, 145, 147

Zvenigora (Dovzhenko, 1929) 195

262 INDEX

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