Download Green Roof Systems: A Guide to the Planning, Design and Construction of Building Over Structure PDF

TitleGreen Roof Systems: A Guide to the Planning, Design and Construction of Building Over Structure
Author
File Size22.1 MB
Total Pages322
Table of Contents
                            Green Roof Systems
	Contents
	Chapter 1 Replenishing Our Diminishing Resources: Integrating Landscape and Architecture
	Chapter 2 Beyond the Property Line: Ecological, Economic, Spatial, and Social Benefits of Green Roof Systems
	Chapter 3 Envisioning Green Roof Systems: From City Scale to Project Scale
	Chapter 4 Green Roof Systems at the Project Scale: Site and Architectural Considerations
	Chapter 5 Considerations in Developing Structural Systems for Green Roof Systems
	Chapter 6 Component Parts: Inert and Dynamic
	Chapter 7 Putting the Parts Together: The Design and Documentation Process
	Chapter 8 The Bidding and Construction Process
	Chapter 9 Minimizing, Managing, and Insuring Risk
	Chapter 10 Maintenance Requirements and Performance Evaluation
	Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

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Page 161

Component Parts: Inert and Dynamic 153

FIGURE 6-23 Installation of
drainage board over xPs
insulation board, protection
board, and waterproofing
membrane. (Photo © Jeffrey L.
Bruce & Co.)

FIGURE 6-24 EPs blocks for
lightweight fill over structural
deck. (Photo © Jeffrey L.
Bruce & Co.)

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Page 162

ate anaerobic soils conditions. The selection of either xPs or EPs, when used as structural
fill, should be in full collaboration with a structural engineer.

In general, the cost of producing EPs is usually reported to be one-third that of pro-
ducing xPs. Because polystyrene is a petroleum-based product, the cost to produce either
can fluctuate with world oil costs, making both of them potentially a costly alternative.

Location of Insulation in Relationship to Waterproofing

In building and waterproofing systems, the most commonly used insulation material is xPs
boards. Their placement in relationship to top of slab and waterproofing can vary.

When insulation is placed below the structural deck and waterproofing membrane,
some condensation can occur, compromising interior finishes and potentially leading to
the cracking of the structure and rupture of the membrane.

Above the deck, it can be placed above or below the waterproofing membrane.
When insulation is placed below the waterproofing membrane, condensation can occur,
although it will be minimal (and less than if insulation is placed below the structural deck).
Condensation can increase thermal fluctuation; below the membrane, it can increase the
potential for vapor blisters and membrane rupture. Any resultant moisture can travel
under the insulation, making it more difficult to locate and repair any leak.

Generally, the preferred location for insulation is above the waterproofing membrane.
This is often referred to as a protected or inverted roofing membrane assembly (IRMA).
When the insulation is placed above the waterproofing membrane, there is less chance of

154 Green Roof Systems

FIGURE 6-25 EPs blocks can
be easily cut in field with a hot
wire. (Photo © Jeffrey L. Bruce
& Co.)

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Page 321

Transit/parking, integration (enhancement), 78
Trees

aerial hedge, usage, 230f
care/production, contractor responsibility,

286f
delivery weight, 109
design load, 114t
green weights, 112t
installation weight, 109–110
load, calculation, 113, 115–116
location

detail, 108f
perspective, 77f

on-site storage, 288f
outer double row, planting (completion), 262f
pit soil weight, calculation, 115
pit width/depth, determination, 113
planting, 215f
pruning, diagram, 230f
selection, 229f
size, study, 106f
watering system, requirement, 288f

Trunk caliper, measurement, 110
Tuscany vineyard, lawn coverage, 65f

U
Uncommon Ground (Cronon), 19
Underbidding, 221
Underdrainage pipes, usage, 253
Underground parking, 81–83

cost, 80
green roof systems, inclusion, 82

United Nations, gardens, 2f
Unplanned development, result, 6
Upset amount, 276
Urban conditions, tree growth (expectation),

106f
Urban design, usage, 50–52
Urban growth/development, living green

roofs/landscapes over structures (impact
mitigation), 15

Urban heat island effect, 37

Urbanization
cumulative effects, 28
effects, 19, 25
process, 27–28

Urban microclimates, enhancement, 68
Urban space, underutilization, 211f
Urban sprawl, cumulative environmental impacts,

6–8
Urban stormwater

management, BMPs, 32
runoff, concentrated pollutants, 35

Use areas, illustrative plan, 211f
Utilities

damage, potential, 305, 307
fee structures, revision, 45
location, 245
systems, extensiveness, 251f

V
Value engineering, 232
Vegetated roofs, insulation, 13f
Vegetation

protection, thermal fluctuation (insulation), 155
weights/loads, 107
wind load, 116–118

Vehicular/garden circulation, relationships
(conceptualization), 92f

Very-large-caliper trees, installation, 69f
Viewshed diagrams, 56f
Vila Olimpica

architecture/landscape, merger, 14f
concept section, 85f

W
Wall

completion, 224f
detail, 117f
mockup, 228f

Wall/tree locations, construction photo, 77f
Warranties, 276

terms, negotiation, 277

Water, 118–119
heaviness, 216f
quality, 34–35
quantity, 28–30

Waterproofing, 134–146, 177–178
consultant, usage, 146
damage, potential, 305, 307
insulation location, relationship, 154–155
materials, impact, 131
replacement, 226f
specification section, 187f–188f
system, selection, 141–142

considerations, 142–145
systems, 232
types, 134–141
warranties, understanding, 276–277

Waterproofing membrane
damage, 145f
Europe/U.S. comparison, 142
flood testing, 144f
heat-welding seams, 138f
installation/protection, 246
insulation, 156f
systems, 136t–137t

impact, 275
Watersheds

property lines, independence, 27–28
urbanization, 29

Weeds
growth, 293, 295
types, 297t–300t

Weed seed bank, 295
West Ferry Circus, open spaces, 3f
Windborne debris, FM Global concern, 278
Wind load, 116–118
Wind mitigation, linear relationships, 204f
Windscreens

eye-level view, 210f
usage, 204f

Work
performing, qualifications, 226, 228
scope, bidding, 217, 219

Working slab, slope (provision), 148

Index 313

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Page 322

ALTERNATIVE CONSTRUCTION:
CONTEMPORARY NATURAL
BUILDING METHODS

by Lynne Elizabeth and Cassandra Adams

BIOPHILIC DESIGN: THE THEORY,
SCIENCE, AND PRACTICE OF
BRINGING BUILDINGS TO LIFE

by Stephen R. Kellert, Judith Heerwagen,
and Martin Mador

CITIES PEOPLE PLANET: URBAN
DEVELOPMENT AND CLIMATE
CHANGE, SECOND EDITION

by Herbert Girardet

CONTRACTOR'S GUIDE TO GREEN
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION:
MANAGEMENT, PROJECT DELIVERY,
DOCUMENTATION, AND RISK
REDUCTION

by Thomas E. Glavinich and Associated
General Contractors

DESIGN WITH NATURE
by Ian L. McHarg

ECODESIGN: A MANUAL FOR
ECOLOGICAL DESIGN

by Ken Yeang

ENVIRONMENTALLY RESPONSIBLE
DESIGN: GREEN AND SUSTAINABLE
DESIGN FOR INTERIOR DESIGNERS

by Louise Jones

GREEN BIM: SUCCESSFUL SUSTAINABLE
DESIGN WITH BUILDING
INFORMATION MODELING

by Eddy Krygel and Brad Nies

GREEN BUILDING MATERIALS: A GUIDE
TO PRODUCT SELECTION AND
SPECIFICATION, SECOND EDITION

by Ross Spiegel and Dru Meadows

GREEN DEVELOPMENT: INTEGRATING
ECOLOGY AND REAL ESTATE

by Rocky Mountain Institute

GREEN ROOF SYSTEMS: A GUIDE TO
THE PLANNING, DESIGN AND
CONSTRUCTION OF LANDSCAPES
OVER STRUCTURE

by Susan Weiler and Katrin Scholz-Barth

THE HOK GUIDEBOOK TO SUSTAINABLE
DESIGN, SECOND EDITION

by Sandra Mendler, William Odell, and
Mary Ann Lazarus

THE INTEGRATIVE DESIGN GUIDE TO
GREEN BUILDING: REDEFINING THE
PRACTICE OF SUSTAINABILITY

by 7group and Bill Reed

LAND AND NATURAL DEVELOPMENT
(LAND) CODE

by Diana Balmori and Gaboury Benoit

A LEGAL GUIDE TO URBAN AND
SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
FOR PLANNERS, DEVELOPERS
AND ARCHITECTS

by Daniel Slone, Doris S. Goldstein, and
W. Andrew Gowder

MATERIALS FOR SUSTAINABLE SITES:
A COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE
EVALUATION, SELECTION, AND USE
OF SUSTAINABLE CONSTRUCTION
MATERIALS

by Meg Calkins

MODERN SUSTAINABLE RESIDENTIAL
DESIGN: A GUIDE FOR DESIGN
PROFESSIONALS

by William J. Carpenter

PACKAGING SUSTAINABILITY: TOOLS,
SYSTEMS AND STRATEGIES FOR
INNOVATIVE PACKAGE DESIGN

by Wendy Jedlicka

SUSTAINABLE COMMERCIAL INTERIORS
by Penny Bonda and Katie Sosnowchik

SUSTAINABLE CONSTRUCTION: GREEN
BUILDING DESIGN AND DELIVERY,
SECOND EDITION

by Charles J. Kibert

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN: ECOLOGY,
ARCHITECTURE, AND PLANNING

by Daniel Williams

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN: THE SCIENCE
OF SUSTAINABILITY AND GREEN
ENGINEERING

by Daniel Vallero and Chris Brasier

SUSTAINABLE HEALTHCARE
ARCHITECTURE

by Robin Guenther and Gail Vittori

SUSTAINABLE RESIDENTIAL INTERIORS
by Associates III

SUSTAINABLE URBANISM: URBAN
DESIGN WITH NATURE

by Douglas Farr

Environmental Benefits Statement

This book is printed with soy-based inks on presses with VOC levels that are lower than the standard for the printing industry. The paper, Rol-
land Enviro 100, is manufactured by Cascades Fine Papers Group and is made from 100 percent post-consumer, de-inked fiber, without chlo-
rine. According to the manufacturer, the use of every ton of Rolland Enviro100 Book paper, switched from virgin paper, helps the environment
in the following ways:

Mature trees
saved

Waterborne
waste not
created

Water flow
saved

Atmospheric
emissions
eliminated

Solid Wastes
reduced

Natural gas
saved by

using biogas

17 6.9 lbs. 10,196 gals. 2,098 lbs. 1,081 lbs. 2,478 cubic feet

For these and other Wiley books on sustainable design, visit www.wiley.com/go/sustainabledesign

bindex.qxp 3/12/09 9:29 AM Page 314

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