Download Force: Dynamic Life Drawing for Animators PDF

TitleForce: Dynamic Life Drawing for Animators
PublisherFocal Press
ISBN 139780240808451
CategoryArts - Film
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size10.0 MB
Total Pages245
Table of Contents
                            Front Cover
Force: Dynamic Life Drawing for Animators
Copyright Page
Contents
Chapter 1: Seeing Life
	The awareness of force
		The main idea in the figure
		Directional force: a beginning, middle, and end
		Applied force
	The road of rhythm
	The roller coaster of rhythm
	Force pointers
Chapter 2: Forceful Form
	Perspective: the drama of angles
		One, two, and three points
		Four-point perspective
	Structure
		Surface lines
		Sculpting force
	Spatial concepts
		Overlap and tangents
		Size and foreshortening
	Forceful form exercises
Chapter 3: Forceful Shape
	Silhouette
	Forceful shape
		The do's and dont's of forceful shape
	Anatomy as shape
	Reaction, the leap of faith
	Forceful shape pointers
Chapter 4: Clothing
	The texture of line revealed
	The function and form of fabric
	Fun with shapes
	Forceful texture pointers
Chapter 5: On Location, Reportage
	Tell stories with life
		Inner thoughts, outer reaction
		Staging, single person
		Multiple moments
		Relationships
		Crowds
	Reportage pointers
Chapter 6: Animals
	Comparative anatomy
	Going to the zoo
		Simplistic seals
		Plantigrade
		Digigrade
		Unguligrade
		Primates
		Birds
	Animal pointers
	Closing
		Recommended Reading
		Glossary
Index
	A
	B
	C
	D
	E
	F
	G
	H
	I
	J
	K
	L
	M
	N
	O
	P
	R
	S
	T
	U
	V
	W
	Z
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

Force

Page 122

First the don’t:

1. Don’t create a shape with parallel lines. Force has no way of moving obliquely through the body.
As we will discuss further, human anatomy is not built in a parallel manner.

2. Don’t have the same kind of force on either side of the same shape. I call this mirroring. Here the
forces crash after doing their function.

3. This is similar to number 2 in that the forces mirror each other. Here they collide at the peak of
their function.

Now let’s talk about the do’s:

4. Do draw oblique forces. This is what creates rhythm. Think of the skiing analogy I made earlier.

Forceful Shape 105

Page 123

5. Do see straight to curve simplicity in the figure. Here we have created a shape that has function
or force to it. It is appealing because of its contrast in ideas, and it also has direction. There are
no mirroring moments.

The curve is the energy that moves through the shape, and the straight helps direct its path and give
it structure.

6. Do see different kinds of shapes. Here we have straight to curve again, but represented in a
different shape.

7. Do see the massive variety in which these rules can be applied. Here is a curve against a straight
and a curve to give us a play of forces.

8. In this example, I want you to see how shape can explain form. Where the white shape overlaps
the black shape, it describes its surface. The spatial concepts come in handy now. Size, overlap,
and tangent theories help shape gain structure. You should still help yourself feel form to see
more convincing, clear shapes.

An artist that I utilize to show students the graphic yet functional effect of straight to curve is Mike
Mignola. He is the creator of “Hellboy,” the comic book. His brilliant designs show forceful figures in
a simple and efficient way. Check him out! His new book, “The Art of Hellboy,” is awesome.

106 Force: Dynamic Life Drawing for Animators

Page 244

Kley, Heinrich, 73
Knees, 18, 49, 63, 64, 69, 79, 152, 162
Knuckle line, 123, 195

Leading edge, 17–22, 219
Learning, 55
Legs, 18, 19, 36, 69, 76, 84, 89, 90, 113, 114,

120, 121, 130, 151, 152, 162, 197
Leroy Neiman, Art and Lifestyle, 170
Leyendecker, J. C., 120–121, 151
Life, seeing, 1
Lifeless shapes, 102
Limbs, 120, 196
Line, 2, 13, 47, 68, 74, 78, 79, 126

versus energy/idea, 3–4, 26
texture, 141, 192

Line pressure, 138
Lion, 202, 207–208
Lively shapes, 102
Lower body, 100

MacDonald, Richard, 73
Mass, 13, 199, 207
McMullan, Jim, 1
Michelangelo, 73

Pieta, 141
Mickey Mouse, 104
Mignola, Mike, 106
Mike D., 16, 60, 71, 72, 101, 132, 167
Mind’s eye, 1, 44
Mirroring, 105

absence, 109, 120
Model, 68, 169–170

expression, 130
movement, 8, 17, 18

Moore, Fred, 44
Motion, 17, 18, 23
Mouth, 58, 59, 182
Multiple moments, 176–181
Musculature, 39, 67, 119, 120, 132, 137

Neck, to back, 39, 40, 155, 198
Negative space, 99, 173, 182
Neiman, Leroy, 170
Nose, 58, 59

Oblique forces, 34, 105
On-location drawings, 169–170
One-minute drawings, 5, 45

One-point perspective, 56, 57
Opinion, based on knowledge

analogy, x
exaggeration, x–xi

Opposite (opposing) curve, 8, 28
Overlap, 82–87, 91, 108, 110, 111

Pairing, 36
Panda, 207
Passion, xi
Pawed animals see Digigrade
Pelvis, 8, 28, 31, 38
Perspectives, 55, 74, 75, 113, 191, 205

four-points, 60–66
one, two, and three points, 56–60
awareness, 57

Plantigrade, 194–195, 205–207
Polar bear, 206
Pose, 1, 2, 5–7, 12, 28, 40, 42, 99, 107, 112, 119,

150, 154, 182, 199
Positive space, 99
Pressure, 28, 53, 144, 160

of line, 138
Primates, 214–218

baboons, 216
red-tailed monkey, 215
silver-leafed monkey, 214, 215
western lowland gorillas, 217–218

Reaction, 127
outer reaction, 170–172

Red-tailed monkey, 215
Relationships, 24, 28, 31, 48, 182–188

types, 185
Repetitive lines, 18, 19
Reportage, 169, 170

pointers, 192
Rhino, 209–210
Rhythm, 23, 70, 110, 182, 198, 200

common errors, 26
oblique forces, 105
roller coaster, 44–53

Ribcage, 17, 18, 20, 29, 31, 38, 39, 40, 74, 78,
79, 80, 84, 86, 123, 146

to hip relationship, 25, 30, 51, 70
Road of rhythm, 23–44

errors, 26
Roller coaster, of rhythm, 44–53
Roth, Mike, xii, 58, 114, 154, 173, 180

Index 227

Page 245

Sculpting force, 72–81
Seals, 202–204
Shape, 94, 97–98, 103, 111

forceful shape, 103, 119, 131, 177
fun with, 164–168
simplicity of, 133, 169, 180, 216
un-forceful shape, 102

Shoulder, 19, 21, 40, 77, 85, 130, 137, 138, 146,
155

Silhouette, 98–103, 109, 113, 173, 174, 186
Simple to complex depictions, 119
Size, 88–94
Skating, 4, 53
Skiing analogy, 24, 31, 105
Sleeping Beauty, 103
Space, 44, 55, 56, 73, 74, 81, 82, 88, 94, 154,

157
negative space, 99, 173, 182
positive space, 99

Spaghetti line, 26
Spatial concepts

foreshortening, 82, 89–94
overlap, 82, 83–87, 91, 94
size, 88
tangents, 9, 82

Sports, 184, 188, 192
clothes, 181

Square, 102
Squash, 13, 180, 202, 221
Staging, single person, 173–176
Sterno-cleido-mastoid, 39
Still, 18, 23, 79, 86, 102, 169, 211
Stomach, 84, 206
Stories, with life

crowds, 188–192
inner thoughts, outer reaction, 170–172
multiple moments, 176–181
relationships, 182–188
staging, single person, 173–176

Straight line, 24, 57, 65, 144, 145, 147, 207
versus curved line, 107

Straight to curve, 103, 104, 106, 108–109,
111–118, 121, 123, 126, 154, 159, 204,
213

Stretch, 40

Structure, 67
sculpting force, 72–81
surface lines, 67–72

Supplies, xiii
Surface lines, 67, 74, 76, 78

forceful flight, 68–72
Swing, 179

“T” rule, 82
Tangents, 9, 82–87
Tartakovsky, Genndy, 104
Texture, 141–149, 192

drawing fabric, 143
The Congo, 214, 217
Three-point perspective, 56–57
Thumbnail, 9, 19, 48, 49, 112, 115, 121, 174,

188, 191
Timm, Bruce, 104
Torso, 28, 40, 109, 113, 119–120
Triangle, 102
Truth, x–xi, 71

assumption, xi
opinion based on knowledge, x

Two-point perspective, 56, 58

Unappealing shape, 103
see also Un-forceful shape

Un-forceful shapes, 102
old cartoons, 103

Unguligrade, 194–195, 209–213
black rhino, 209
giraffe, 211
horses, 193, 195
impala, 211
Indian rhino, 210
zebra, 210

Upper body, 17, 116
Visual journalist, 169

Waist, 146
Walt Disney Consumer Products, 104
Western lowland gorillas, 217–218
Wrinkle, 143, 150, 154, 158, 159
Wrist, 194, 196, 219

Zoo, 202

228 Index

Similer Documents