Download Cinema and Nation PDF

TitleCinema and Nation
PublisherRoutledge
ISBN 139780415208635
CategoryArts - Film
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size2.9 MB
Total Pages345
Table of Contents
                            BOOK COVER
HALF-TITLE
TITLE
COPYRIGHT
DEDICATION
CONTENTS
LIST OF FIGURES
CONTRIBUTORS
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
INTRODUCTION
PART I THE SOCIOLOGY OF NATIONALISM
1 THE SOCIOLOGICAL SCOPE OF ‘NATIONAL CINEMA'
2 FRANK CAPRA MEETS JOHN DOE: aNTI-POLITICS IN AMEREICAN NATIONAL IDENTITY
3 IMAGES OF THE NATION CINEMA, ART AND NATIONAL IDENTITY
PART II THE CONCEPT OF NATIONAL CINEMA
4 THE LIMITING IMAGINATION OF NATIONAL CINEMA
5 NATIONAL CINEMA: A THEORETICAL ASSESSEMENT
6 FRAMING NATIONAL CINEMAS
7 THEMES OF NATION
PART III FILM POLICY, NATIONALISM AND THE STATE
8 CINEMATIC NATION-BUILDING
9 THE NATION VANISHES: EUROPEAN CO-PRODUCTION NAD POPULAR GENRE FORMULA IN THE 1950 AND 1960
10 THE NEW SCOTTISH CINEMA
PART IV THE PRODUCTION OF NATIONAL IMAGES
11 INDONESIA THE MOVIE
12 NOTES ON POLISH CINEMA, NATIONALISM AND WAJDA'S HOLY WEEK
13 DEEP NATION THE NATIONAL QUESTION AND TURKISH CINEMA CULTURE
14 FRAGMENTING THE NATION
PART V THE RECEPTION OF NATIONAL IMAGES
15 MIMETIC NATIONHOOD
16 FROM NEW GERMAN CINEMA TO THE
17 CONTEMPORARY CINEMA
18 BIRTHING NATIONS
NAME INDEX
SUBJECT INDEX
                        
Document Text Contents
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CINEMA AND NATION

In Cinema and Nationleading film scholars, philosophers and sociologists consider the
ways in which film production and reception are shaped by ideas of national identity and
belonging. The contributors discuss a wide range of cinemas, in Europe, Asia and the
Americas, exploring the relationship between film policy and film cultures, and
examining the implications of globalisation and the reconfiguration of nation states for
both the concept and the reality of national cinema.

In the book’s first three sections, contributors explore sociological approaches to
national identity, challenge established ideas about ‘national cinema’, and consider the
ways in which nation states—from the former Soviet Union to contemporary Scotland—
use cinema in their efforts to create a national culture. The final two sections focus on the
diverse strategies involved in the production of national cinema, and consider how
images of the nation are understood by audiences both at home and abroad.

Contributors: Asu Aksoy, Sally Banes, Tim Bergfelder, Noël Carroll, Sumita
S.Chakravarty, Paul Coates, Jane M.Gaines, John A.Hall, Susan Hayward, Ulf Hedetoft,
Andrew Higson, Mette Hjort, Ian Jarvie, Charles Lindholm, Scott MacKenzie, Duncan
Petrie, Eric Rentschler, Martin Roberts, Kevin Robins, Philip Schlesinger, Anthony
Smith.

Mette Hjort is Associate Professor in the Department of Languages and Intercultural
Studies, Aalborg University. Scott MacKenzie is Lecturer in Film and Television
Studies at the School of English and American Studies, University of East Anglia,
Norwich.

Page 172

Bibliography

Blain, N. (1990) ‘A Scotland as Good as Any Other?: Documentary Film, 1932–82’, in
E.Dick (ed.).

Bruce, D. (1996) Scotland the Movie, Edinburgh: Polygon.
Calderwood, A. (1996) ‘Film and Television Policy in Scotland’, in J.Hainsworth, J.Hill

and M.McLoone (eds).
Caughie, J. (1990) ‘Representing Scotland: New Questions for Scottish Cinema’, in E.

Dick (ed.).
Dick, E. (ed.) (1990) From Limelight to Satellite: A Scottish Film Book,

London/Glasgow: BFI/SFC.
——(1994) ‘Poor Wee Scottish Cinema’, Scottish Film 10:19–23.
Gormley, C. (1990) ‘The Impact of Channel 4’, in E.Dick (ed.).
Hainsworth, J., J.Hill and M.McLoone (eds) (1996) Border Crossing: Film in Ireland,

Britain and Europe, Belfast: US/Queen’s University.
Hardy, F. (1990) Scotland in Film, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
Hill, J. (1992) ‘The Issue of National Cinema and British Film Production’, in D.Petrie

(ed.).
——(1997) ‘British Cinema as National Cinema: Production, Audience, Representation’,

in R.Murphy (ed.).
——(1999) British Cinema in the 1980s, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
Lockerbie, I. (1990) ‘Pictures in a Small Country: The Scottish Film Production Fund’, in

E.Dick (ed.).
McArthur, C. (1993) ‘In Praise of a Poor Cinema’, Sight and Sound 3, 8:30–2.
——(1994a) ‘The Cultural Necessity of a Poor Celtic Cinema’, in J.Hainsworth, J.Hill

and M.McLoone (eds).

worth noting that the SFPF investment in Prague represented a mere 6.5 per cent of the final
£2,000,000 budget.

4 The substantial sums of money released dirough the mechanism of the lottery have helped to
stimulate production to unprecedented levels. But the administration of this fund has also
generated the greatest amount of controversy. The initial panel charged with administering
the new money was effectively the sitting board of the Scottish Film Production Fund. But
following a bitter and acrimonious public dispute between Bill Forsyth and the board over
allegations of corruption, the Scottish Arts Council established its own panel in 1997. The
dispute arose out of the (inevitable) dilemma of having a selection panel which makes
decisions affecting major investments towards feature production consisting of professional
Scottish film-makers who effectively depend on all available sources of film finance for their
livelihood. The subsequent reporting of the incident in the Scottish press highlighted
objections made by Forsyth and other film-makers to the process but also specifically to the
awards made to Regeneration and The Life of Stuff, produced respectively by panel members
Allan Shiach (also the chair) and Lynda Myles. Ironically, two years later negotiations are
taking place for the return of administrative responsibility for lottery money to Scottish
Screen.

5 This is developed principally in McArthur 1993 and at greater length in McArthur 1994a.

The new Scottish cinema 157

Page 173

——(1994b) ‘Tartan Shorts and the Taming of the First Reels’, Scottish Film 9:19–20.
Murphy, R. (ed.) (1997) The British Cinema Book, London: BFI.

Petrie, D. (ed.) (1992) New Questions of British Cinema, London: BFI.
Scottish Screen (1998) Scottish Screen Data 1996, 3rd edn, Glasgow: Scottish Screen.
——(1999) Scottish Screen Data 1997, 4th edn, Glasgow: Scottish Screen.
Thomas, N. (1998) ‘UK Film, Television and Video Overview’, BFI Handbook 1998,

London: BFI.
Willemen, P. (1994) ‘The National’, in P.Willemen, Looks and Frictions: Essays in

Cultural Studies and Film Theory, London: BFI.

Cinema and nation 158

Page 344

fragmentation of nation 228–9, 231–2;
framing national cinema 89, 94;
limiting national cinema 63–4, 69–70;
national cinema 76, 78, 81, 85;
Polish cinema 197, 199;
scope of national cinema 27;
Soviet Union 122–3, 129;
Turkish cinema 203, 206, 208, 211–13, 215

State of the Union (Capra 1948) 36
status 32, 228 –9
stereotyping 138, 154, 214, 233, 259, 263–4, 267, 270 –1
stranger concept and fragmentation of nation 210, 212, 214 –7
structure and communitas concept 228–32, 236
supranationalism 17
symbolism 41–3, 51, 98, 105, 164, 166, 169, 264, 231, 235 –6


tableaux 48
Taman Mini, Jakarta 161–2, 167 –71
Tango (Clausen 1997) 103 –4
‘Tartan Shorts’ 149, 152
technology 26, 74–5, 249 –
television 77, 104, 144–7, 149, 152, 195, 248–9, 253
terrorism and India 206 –17
Terrorist, The (Sivan 1999) 206
theatre and Polish cinema 182 –3
themes of nation 94 –106
theoretical assessment of national cinema 68 –77
third cultures concept 262, 266 –73
time 91, 171, 259, 261, 262, 273, 280, 285
tourism 62, 144, 162, 165 –9
tractor as image 112, 114–7, 119 –21
tradition:

art and identity 45, 48, 57;
birth of nations 302;
framing national cinema 90;
German cinema 275;
Indonesian movies 183–4;
invented 46–7;
limiting images of national cinema 64, 67, 71, 73;
mimesis and ethnography 253–5;
Soviet Union 121, 132;
Turkish cinema 208–9

transnationalism:
contemporary cinema 278, 280–2, 284–5, 288, 292–6;
European co-production 140, 151;
fragmentation of nation 234–5;
German cinema 268;
Indonesian movies 175, 178–80;

Subject index 329

Page 345

limiting national cinema 64–9, 72–3
Turkish cinema 189 –202
Twenty First Films 152
Twist and Shout (August 1984) 99
Ulusal Sinema, (Turkey) 198


unity:

fragmentation of nation 223–6, 228–30;
framing national cinema 88;
Indonesian movies 175–8;
limiting images of national cinema 65;
Polish cinema 189–90, 192;
scope of national cinema 19;
Soviet Union 130–1;
Turkish cinema 208, 210–11, 213, 215–16, 218

universality and contemporary cinema 260–1, 271, 273
urban-rural:

themes in Soviet Union 121–2, 124–5, 128, 131, 133;
Turkish cinema 208–10, 212–13, 216

USA:
anti-politics and identity 32–43;
contemporary cinema 279–80, 286–95;
European co-production 139–43, 145, 147, 149;
fragmentation of nation 222–3;
framing national cinema 96–7;
German cinema 263, 268–9, 271–2;
Indonesian movies 173–6, 178–9;
national cinema 75, 77–86;
South as nation 298–9, 301, 305–7, 311–13;
Soviet Union 132–3


valorisation 191
values 85–7, 262, 264, 267, 268–71, 273 –4
Video in the Villages (Carelli 1989) 234 –6
villains 137
Viva Zapata (Kazan 1952) 45


Waiãpi Indians, Brazil 234 –6
war films 269 –71
Western genre 282–3, 290


Yeni Sinema (Turkey) 198


Zeitgeist 24, 250, 253
Zulu people and birth of nations 279–81, 286 –9

Subject index 330

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