Download Cartoon Animation PDF

TitleCartoon Animation
PublisherWalter Foster
ISBN 139781560100843
CategoryArts - Film
Author
Languagerussian
File Size41.4 MB
Total Pages202
Table of Contents
                            Chapter 1 : CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT
	1 / Chapter 1 • Introduction • Chapter 1 : CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT
	2 / Chapter 1 • Page 10 • CARTOON CONSTRUCTION
	3 / Chapter 1 • Page 12 • BODY BUILT FROM CIRCULAR AND ROUNDED FORMS
	4 / Chapter 1 • Page 14 • MORE CIRCULAR AND ROUNDED FORMS
	5 / Chapter 1 • Page 16 • THE SKELETON FOUNDATION
	6 / Chapter 1 • Page 18 • CONSTRUCTION OF THE HEAD
	7 / Chapter 1 • Page 19 • EGGHEAD MODEL METHOD
	8 / Chapter 1 • Page 20 • MORE HEAD CONSTRUCTION
	9 / Chapter 1 • Page 22 • MORE HEAD CONSTRUCTION
	10 / Chapter 1 • Page 24 • FACIAL EXPRESSIONS
	11 / Chapter 1 • Page 26 • STRETCH AND SQUASH ON HEADS
	12 / Chapter 1 • Page 28 • HANDS
	13 / Chapter 1 • Page 30 • MORE HANDS
	14 / Chapter 1 • Page 32 • THE CUTE CHARACTER
	15 / Chapter 1 • Page 34 • THE CUTE KITTEN
	16 / Chapter 1 • Page 36 • CUTE PUP
	17 / Chapter 1 • Page 38 • GOOSE GANDER
	18 / Chapter 1 • Page 40 • ROWDY RABBIT
	19 / Chapter 1 • Page 42 • LITTLE WOLF-HUNTER PIG
	20 / Chapter 1 • Page 44 • CUTE RABBIT
	21 / Chapter 1 • Page 46 • SQUIRRELS
	22 / Chapter 1 • Page 48 • MORE CUTE CHARACTERS
	23 / Chapter 1 • Page 50 • THE SCEWBALL TYPE
	24 / Chapter 1 • Page 51 • GOOFY CHARACTER
	25 / Chapter 1 • Page 52 • THE HEAVY, PUGNACIOUS CHARACTER
	26 / Chapter 1 • Page 54 • MORE ANIMAL CHARACTERS
	27 / Chapter 1 • Page 58 • MUSICAL WOLF
	28 / Chapter 1 • Page 60 • WOLF HEADS
	29 / Chapter 1 • Page 62 • LIONS AND TIGERS
	30 / Chapter 1 • Page 64 • BIRDS
	31 / Chapter 1 • Page 66 • OWLS
	32 / Chapter 1 • Page 68 • MORE BIRDS
	33 / Chapter 1 • Page 70 • THE BELLIGERANT BULLDOG
	34 / Chapter 1 • Page 72 • BULLDOG SAILOR
	35 / Chapter 1 • Page 74 • FORESHORTENING - PERSPECTIVE
	36 / Chapter 1 • Page 76 • GNOMES
	37 / Chapter 1 • Page 78 • ELVES
	38 / Chapter 1 • Page 79 • DWARFS
	39 / Chapter 1 • Page 80 • WICKED WITCH
	40 / Chapter 1 • Page 82 • KIDS
	41 / Chapter 1 • Page 84 • THE YOUNG HEROINE
Chapter 2 : CHARACTER MOVEMENT
	42 / Chapter 2 • Introduction • Chapter 2 : CHARACTER MOVEMENT
	43 / Chapter 2 • Page 90 • LINE OF ACTION
	44 / Chapter 2 • Page 92 • LINE OF ACTION IN ANIMATION
	45 / Chapter 2 • Page 94 • RHYTHM AND DESIGN IN CARTOON ART
	46 / Chapter 2 • Page 96 • MOVEMENT OF BODY MASSES
	48 / Chapter 2 • Page 100 • THE BASIC BOUNCING BALL ACTION
	49 / Chapter 2 • Page 102 • MOVEMENTS OF THE FOUR-LEGGED FIGURE
	50 / Chapter 2 • Page 104 • FRONT AND REAR VIEWS OF FIGURE MOVEMENTS
	51 / Chapter 2 • Page 106 • THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WALK AND RUN
	52 / Chapter 2 • Page 107/108 • THE WALK & THE RUN
	53 / Chapter 2 • Page 109 • THE FAST RUN
	54 / Chapter 2 • Page 110 • THE SNEAK
	55 / Chapter 2 • Page 112 • THE SKIP
	56 / Chapter 2 • Page 114 • THE STRUT
	57 / Chapter 2 • Page 118 • FOUR-LEGGED ANIMALS - CONSTRUCTION AND MOVEMENT
	58 / Chapter 2 • Page 120 • MORE FOUR-LEGGED ANIMALS
	59 / Chapter 2 • Page 122 • THE FLIGHT OF BIRDS
	60 / Chapter 2 • Page 124 • CYCLES IN COLOR
Chapter 3 : ANIMATION
	61 / Chapter 3 • Introduction • Chapter 3 : ANIMATION
	62 / Chapter 3 • Page 128 • SKETCHING BASICS - A SHORTHAND ART
	63 / Chapter 3 • Page 130 • BALANCE AND TILT IN MOVEMENT
	64 / Chapter 3 • Page 132 • BALANCE AND TILT - CONTINUED
	65 / Chapter 3 • Page 134 • STRAIGHT-AHEAD AND RHYTHM ANIMATION
	66 / Chapter 3 • Page 136 • ANTICIPATION - ACTION - REACTION
	67 / Chapter 3 • Page 138 • STRAIGHT-AHEAD ANIMATION
	68 / Chapter 3 • Page 139 • POSE-PLANNING DRAMATICS
	69 / Chapter 3 • Page 140 • ARCS - CURVES - PATHS OF ACTION
	70 / Chapter 3 • Page 141 • MULTIPLE ACTION PATHS IN BOUNCE-STRUT
	71 / Chapter 3 • Page 142 • THE WAVE PRINCIPLE
	72 / Chapter 3 • Page 144 • DELAYED SECONDARY ACTION
	73 / Chapter 3 • Page 146 • FAST ACTION - IMPACT - SPEED
	74 / Chapter 3 • Page 148 • THE CARTOON "TAKE"
	75 / Chapter 3 • Page 149 • SURPRISE REACTION
	76 / Chapter 3 • Page 150 • EXPRESSING AN ATTITUDE
	77 / Chapter 3 • Page 152 • EMOTION - GESTURE - REACTING
	78 / Chapter 3 • Page 153 • THE BODY LANGUAGE ACTOR
	79 / Chapter 3 • Page 154 • WEIGHT-RECOIL EFFECTS
	80 / Chapter 3 • Page 156 • THE SQUASH AND STRETCH PRINCIPLE
	81 / Chapter 3 • Page 158 • DANCING HIPPO
	82 / Chapter 3 • Page 160 • ALLIGATOR BALLET
	83 / Chapter 3 • Page 164 • HIPPO AND ALLIGATOR BALLET
	84 / Chapter 3 • Page 168 • WOMEN
	85 / Chapter 3 • Page 170 • BUILDING AN ACTION
	86 / Chapter 3 • Page 172 • A DANCE KICK
	87 / Chapter 3 • Page 176 • BACK-GROUND CONTROL
	88 / Chapter 3 • Page 178 • COMPOSITION - STAGING - DRAMA
Chapter 4 : DIALOGUE
	89 / Chapter 4 • Introduction • Chapter 4 : DIALOGUE
	90 / Chapter 4 • Page 182 • DIALOGUE EXPRESSIONS - POINTERS
	91 / Chapter 4 • Page 184 • DIALOGUE CHARACTER ACTING
	92 / Chapter 4 • Page 186 • DIALOGUE - VOWELS & CONSONANTS
	93 / Chapter 4 • Page 188 • MOUTH ACTION - PRONUNCIATION
	94 / Chapter 4 • Page 190 • THE HECKLER
Chapter 5 : TECHNICAL
	95 / Chapter 5 • Introduction • Chapter 5 : TECHNICAL
	96 / Chapter 5 • Page 196 • TIMING AND SPACING PATTERNS
	97 / Chapter 5 • Page 198 • ACCENTS - BEATS - SCENE TIMING
	98 / Chapter 5 • Page 200 • CYCLES-PLANNED ANIMATION
	99 / Chapter 5 • Page 202 • LIMITED ANIMATION - CUTOUTS
	100 / Chapter 5 • Page 204 • MAKING AN ANIMATION CEL
	101 / Chapter 5 • Page 206 • COLORING THE CEL
	102 / Chapter 5 • Page 208 • THE CARTOON STORYBOARD
	103 / Chapter 5 • Page 212 • BACKGROUND LAYOUT DRAWINGS
	104 / Chapter 5 • Page 214 • STILL BACK GROUNDS. TRUCKS. AND FIELDS
	105 / Chapter 5 • Page 216 • PAN BACK GROUNDS. OVERLAYS. CELS
	106 / Chapter 5 • Page 218 • CAMERA AND TECHNICAL
	107 / Chapter 5 • Page 220 • HOW CARTOONS ARE MADE
	108 / Chapter 5 • Page 221 • POINTERS ON ANIMATION
	109 / Chapter 5 • Page 222 • HOW TO MAKE A CARTOON FILM
	110 / Chapter 5 • Page 224 • OTHER BOOKS ABOUT ANIMATING
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

Chapter 1 - Chapitre 1: Introduction

Chapitre 1 : ÉLABORATION des PERSONNAGES

It can be an exciting experience to create and develop an original cartoon character. Constructing and
developing a character is not merely a matter of drawing the figure, each character also has its own shape,
personality, features, and mannerisms. The animator has to take these qualities into consideration to make the
characters seem lifelike and believable. For example, there are various personality types such as "goofy,"
"cute," and "screwball". Think about the type of character you wish to design, then use the diagrams and guides
shown in this chapter to begin your drawing. When creating a character, you should begin by drawing rough
"idea" sketches. These will give you a direction for the type and nature of the character you wish to create.
Develop the basic shape of the figure, then add the features and other details.

This procedure should be followed whether the character you are developing is a human, an animal, or an
inanimate object you wish to bring to life (for example, drawing a face on a computer and making it dance).

After you have developed the character and the proportions arc to your liking, develop the movement
expressions of the body, head, and hands. Hands can tell a complete story with just a simple pose. Study and
practice drawing the hands shown on page 28, then create some hand positions of your own. Also, the "line of
action" section is a big help in creating attitudes in posture and movement. This chapter is the starting point to
a world of exciting cartoon animation.

Page 201

Chapter 5 - Page 224

OTHER BOOKS ABOUT ANIMATING

Every student of the art of animation should read and own these books: Disney Animation: The Illusion of Life
by Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston, Abbeville Press. An excellent and extensive work on how to animate and
how to make Disney-style animated cartoons by two of Disney´s greatest animators.

Cartoon Animation - introduction to a Career by Milton Grey, Lion´s Den Publications. Provides a full perspective
of the animation business and the art of animating in an intimate style that every student animator should read
- and enjoy.

The Human Figure in Motion and Animals in Motion by Edward Muybridge, Dover Press. Reprints of antique
classics containing photographs of actions made before motion pictures were invented. These books are revered
by animators.

American Animation by Michael Barrier, Oxford University Press. An analysis of animation´s past achievements
written in a manner that will give valuable insight into tomorrow´s filmmakers.

Of Mice and Magic by Leonard Maltin, McGraw Hill Book Company. Tells the story of the animated film studios
and traces the beginning of the art of animation. Many pictures and a great style.

FIND THEM ALL at:

MOOVEMEDIA´s BOOKS FOR ANIMATION

www.moovemedia.com/

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