Download Cahiers du Cinema: The 1950s. Neo-Realism, Hollywood, New Wave PDF

TitleCahiers du Cinema: The 1950s. Neo-Realism, Hollywood, New Wave
ISBN 139780415151054
CategoryArts - Film
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size9.4 MB
Total Pages326
Table of Contents
                            Contents
Preface and Acknowledgments
Books Frequenctly Cited in Text
Introduction
Part One: French Cinema
	Introduction
	Francois Truffaut: 'The Rogues are Weary'
	Andre Bazin, Jacques Doniol-Valcroze, Pierre Kast, Roger Leenhardt, Jacques Rivette, Eric Rohme: 'Six Characters in Search of auteurs: a Discussion about the 
French Cinema
	Jean-Luc Godard: 'Sufficient Evidence'
	Jean-Luc Godard: Les 400 Coups
	Fereydoun Hoveyda: 'The First Person Plural'
	Jean Domarchi, Jacques Doniol Valcroze, Jean-Luc Godard, Pierre Kast, Jacques Rivette, Eric Rohmer: 'Hiroshima, notre amour'
Part Two: American Cinema
	Introduction
	I. Perspectives
		Eric Rohmer: 'Rediscovering America'
		Jacques Rivette: 'Notes on a Revolution'
		Andre Bazin: 'The Death of 
Humphrey Bogart'
	II. Dossier - Nicholas Ray
		Jacques Rivette: 'On Imagination'
		Francois Truffaut: 'A Wonderful Certainty'
		Eric Rohmer: 'Ajax or the Cid?'
		Jean-Luc Godard: 'Nothing but 
Cinema'
		Jean-Luc Godard: 'Beyond the 
Stars'
		Charles Bitsch: Interview with Nicholas Ray
	III. Auteurs
		Jacques Rivette: 'The Genius of 
Howard Hawks'
		Jacques Rivette: 'The Essential'
		Claude Chabrol: 'Serious Things'
		Jacques Rivette: 'The Hand'
		Luc Moullet: 'Sam Fuller: In 
Marlowe's Footsteps'
	IV. Genre
		Claude Chabrol: 'Evolution of the 
Thriller'
		Andre Bazin: 'Beauty of a Western'
		Andre Bazin: 'An Exemplary 
Western'
Part Three: Italian Cinema
	Introduction
	Andre Bazin: Umberto D
	Amedee Ayfre: 'Neo-Realism and 
Phenomenology'
	Jacques Rivette: 'Letter o
n Rossellini'
	Eric Rohmer: 'The Land of 
Miracles'
	Interviews with Roberto Rossellini
Part Four: Polemics
	I. Criticism
		Introduction
		Pierre Kast: 'Flattering the Fuzz: Some Remarks on Dandyism and 
the Practice of Cinema'
		Jean Domarchi: 'Knife in the 
Wound'
		Andre Bazin: 'On the politique des 
auteurs'
		Luc Moullet, Andre Bazin, Jacques Rivette: Exchanges about 
Kurosawa and Mizoguchi
		Alexandre Astruc: 'What is mise en 
scene?'
	II. Dossier - CinemaScope
		Introduction
		Francois Truffaut: 'A Full View'
		Jacques Rivette: 'The Age of 
metteurs en scene'
		Eric Rohmer: 'The Cardinal Virtues 
of CinemaScope'
Appendix 1: Cahiers du Cinema Annual Best Films 
Listings 1955-9
Appendix 2: Guide to Cahiers du Cinema Nos 1-102, April 1951 - December 1959, in English 
translation
Appendix 3: Cahiers du Cinema in the 1960s and 1970s
Index of Names and Film Titles
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 163

Luc Moullet: 'Sam Fuller: In Marlowe's Footsteps'

US Constitution which, in present-day terms, are quite cutting. Walking
Coyote confesses that, if he hasn't tried to become the chief of his tribe,
it's because he can't stand politics. Indignant that there are moves to hang
him, he cries: 'Oh! what have we come to! It wasn't like that in my day!
Today there's no more morality. The young massacre the old, they kill,
they get drunk, they rape.' It is an outburst which would be quite at home
in Les Tricheurs4 or in some American sociological film, and which, put
into the mouth of a Sioux in 1865, makes us snigger. Every piece of
dialogue is, for Fuller, a way of amusing himself by disconcerting us; he
pretends to adopt all points of view, and that's what makes his humour
sublime. Every love scene (the one with the eyebrows in House of Bamboo,
the tattooing and the slap in Hell and High Water, which is also a splendid
send-up of polyglot commercialese) is basically a very banal idea made
effective by a text full of verve and originality.

We need madmen
3 A re-creation of life which has very little to do with the version that the
screen imposes on us. Rather than to the civilized Brooks, it is to L' Atalante
that we should refer. Fuller is a coarse character: everything he does is
incongruous. There is a grain of madness in him. But we really need
madmen, for cinema is the most realist of all the arts; and in portraying
existence, sane directors have remained faithful to traditions established
over centuries by literature and painting, arts which have had to set aside
even the most superficial of truths on account of their own temporally
and visually limited realism. Only the insane can hope one day to create
a work comparable to the living model, which will even so never attain a
tenth of the truth of the original. But that's the highest bid. In Fuller we
see everything that other directors deliberately excise from their films:
disorder, filth, the unexplainable, the stubbly chin, and a kind of fasci-
nating ugliness in a man's face. It was a stroke of genius to choose Rod
Steiger, a short, squat, oafish character, completely lacking in stature,
whose squashed-down hat hides his features whenever there is the
slightest high angle shot, but whose ungainly manner and bearing confer
on him the force of life itself. Our director's predilection for corpulent or
plump characters may already have been noticed: Gene Evans, for
example, has the starring role in four of his films. And, applying to these
characters Truffaut's celebrated auteur theory,S his esteem diminishes with
the number of kilos. Those slim heroes with angular profiles, John Ireland,
Vincent Price, Richard Basehart, Richard Kiley, Richard Wid mark, haven't
the necessary weight not to be tempted into despicable acts. Man belongs
to the order of the earth, and he must resemble it, in all the harshness of
its beauty.

Fuller is a primitive, but an intelligent primitive, which is what gives
his work such unusual resonances; the spectacle of the physical world,
the spectacle of the earth, is his best source of inspiration, and if he is

149

Page 164

American Cinema: Auteurs

attached to human beings, it is only to the extent that they are themselves
attached to the earth. That's why woman is often not mentioned (except
in Park Row, Pickup on South Street and Forty Guns, where she behaves like
Fullerian men; except in Hell and High Water, China Gate and again Forty
Guns, where Fuller suggests with an insane talent the contrast between
the angel and the beast, thus removing all ambivalence). That is why he
is especially interested in men's physique - he is inspired a hundred times
by the naked bodies of the Indians, just as he was by the naked bodies
of the sailors in Hell and High Water; coming out of Run of the Arrow, one
has the impression of never having seen real Indians before in a Western
- and the part of the body that interests him more particularly still is the
one that is constantly in contact with the ground: Fuller has a thing
about feet, no doubt about that. In the foreground, at the encounter with
Walking Coyote, the camera scrapes the earth, re-frames on feet, and only
accidentally pulls up towards faces. And this style even becomes the
foundation of the symbolic dimension of the work: the Run of the Arrow,
the pivot and the title of the film, is also the run of a man in moccasins,
pursuing a man without shoes (who is moreover a foot soldier, and who
after meeting a certain Walking Coyote marries a certain Yellow Moccasin).
The best man is the one with the strongest feet. Bloody feet, tired feet,
heavy efficient feet, light feet, booted feet, with what amazing virtuosity
Fuller, who had had all the time he could wish to study the question
during his visit to Japan, delineates the different styles of the runners.
Who better than he could film the Olympic Games in Rome next year?
Buttocks have star billing too, since thirty seconds are devoted to a meticu-
lous study of the problem of the comfort of the horseman on his saddle.

A Vigo-esque disorder
A tellurian director, a poet of the tellurial, he takes a passionate interest
in the instinctive. He likes to show suffering in a way that is even more
sadistic than De Mille: amputations (even the deliberate cutting off of a
hand in Hell and High Water), the painful extraction of bullets from one's
own body (Fixed Bayonets) or from someone else's body (Run of the Arrow)
with great loss of blood. A defenceless kid is mown down on a corner of
Park Row. Love itself does not neglect the joys of sadism (Pickup on South
Street). After being knocked down by repeated blows of a hammer, the
Jap in Hell and High Water complains that he hasn't been hit hard enough
- as if it were just a sham. A festival of cruelties and orgies, Run of the
Arrow ends with that splendid shot in which Meeker, who is being skinned
alive, receives the coup de grace in the form of a bullet right in the middle
of his perspiring, bloody brow.

I have referred to Vigo, and the parallel is even more evident in Pickup,
Steel Helmet and especially Fixed Bayonets: with a carefully worked out
script and in a carefully planned shot, Fuller composes actions which have
no reference to any prefabricated dramaturgy. All kinds of odd things are

150

Page 325

October, 26 67
o'J;>onnell: Cathy, 112
Oell pour oeil, 144
Oland, Warner, 158
On Dangerous Ground, 104,

107, 112, 114, 120-1, 124
162 '

One Exciting Night, 160
Only Angels Have Wings 89

129-30 ' ,
Ophuls, Max, 22-3 36 50

SO,266 ,,'

Ordet, 13, 56, 143 .;, '.
Orphee,22
Oswald, Gerd, 94
Out of the Past, 160
Oxford Opinion, 11

Pabst, G. W., 2
Pagliero, Marcel, 188-9
Pagnol, Marcel. 62
Paisa, 194-5, 201, 209-11
Park Row, 146, 150
Pascal, Blaise, 190
Passion of loan of Arc, The,

270, 277
Pate, Michael, 147
Paura, La, 143
Pavese, Cesare, 37, 39
Peguy, Charles, 203
Pepe Ie Moko, 99
Perkins, V. F" 9-10, 74,

76-7, 80
Picasso, Pablo, 61, 66-7, 90,

193, 251
Pichel, Irving, 5
Pickup on South Street, 146,

148, 150-1, 153
Picnic, 258
Pinky, 230
Pointe courte, La, 66
Posit;!, 1-2, 6, 222
poussin, Nicolas, 193
Preminger, Otto, 3, 9, 79,

95, 116, 132-5, 161-2, 224
Prevert, Pierre, 32-3
Price, Vincent, 149
Proust, Marcel, 65, 162,

199, 266, 268
Prowler, The, 162-3
pudovkin, Vsevolod 1., 2,

238

Quai des Brumes, 61, 88
400 Coups, Les, 10, 22-5, 51,

53-7, 62
Queen Kelly, 57
Quelque part en Europe, 184
Queneau, Raymond, 3, 233

, .

Index of Names and Film Titles

R,lr:nt?, Jean, 252-3
Radigt.!et, Raymond, 67
Raft, George, 100
Rancho Notorious, 91, 278
RasllOmon, 260-2
Ray, Man, 2
Ray, Nicholas, 3, 12,57,

74-7, 79, 81-2, 89, 91,
94-6, 104-5, 107-24, 153,
162, 177, 194, 248, 255

Rear Window, 78, 136-9
Rebecca, 138, 206
Rebel Without a Cause, 76,

111-16, 120-4
Record of a Living Being, 260
Red River} 82, 91, 126,

128-30. 144
Reggiani, Serge, 29
RegIe du jeu, La, 30, 57, 61,

199, 254, 271, 278, 281
Rembrandt van Ryn, 254
Renoir, Claude, 50
Renoir. Jean, 2-5, 7-8,

22-3, 28, 30, 36, 48, 56-7,
60, 62-3, 73, 80, 93, 116,
118-19, 132, 143, 177,
193-4, 197-8, 212, 248-9,

253, 279
Resnais, Alain, 3, 12, 23--6,

59--69
Revolt of Mamie Stover, The,

117
Revue du Cinema, La, 2-3, 5,

225, 232
Rhode, Eric, 5
Ride the High Country, 8
RiJke, Rainer Maria, 265
Rimbaud, Arthur, 252
Rio Bravo, 11-12
Riva, Emmanuelle, 62. 65,

69
River, The, 199-200,254,278
Rivette, Jacques, 4-5, 12,

21, 24---6, 31-45, 59-69,
73-80, 94-7, 104-5, Ill,
126-35, 140-4, 151, 175-8,
192-203, 209, 212-16,
223-5, 255, 257, 270--1,

275-9
Robbe-Grillet, Alain, 24, 64
Robinson, Edward G., 100
Rogers, Ginger, 127
Rohmer, Eric (pseudonym

of Maurice Scherer), 2-5,
12, 21, 24-5, 31-45,
59--69, 73-4, 76, 78, 80-1,
88-93, 111-15, 176-7,
196, 205-8, 209-12,

311

. '';.,'

222-4, 248-50, 254,
270-1, 280-3

Roman, Ruth, 119
Rome, Open City, 177, 201,

205, 209-10
Rope, 273-4, 277, 281
Rossellini, Roberto, 2-5, 8,

21, 25, 36, 39, 51, 56-7. 63,
66, 68, 73, 76-7, SO, 93,
96-7, 108, 117-19, 143-4,
176-$, 184-5, 189,
192-203, 205-7, 209-16,
248, 255

Rosten, Leo, 159
Roud, Richard, 12, 78
Rouquier} Georges, 2
Roussel, Raymond, 129
Run for Cover, 112
Run of the ArroW, 12, 145-53
Russell, Gail, 171-2
Russell, Jane, 117
Ruttmann, Walter, 2
Ryan, Robert, 112

Sadoul. Georges, 2
St, Francis, see Francesco,

guillare di dio
Saint-Real, 238-9
Sait-on jamais?, 13, 23, 47-50
Sanders, George, 196, 206
Sarris, Andrew, 11, 13,

77-8
Sartre, Jean-Paul, 9, 41. 56,

187-9, 252, 273
Scarface, 129, 144, 160--1
Scherer, Maurice, see

Rohmer, Eric
Sciuscia (Shoeshine), 180
Scott. Randolph, 170--2
Searchers, The, 169
Sennett, Mack} 92
Senso, 36
Seven Men from NoW, 82,

169-72
Seven Samurai, The, 260--2,

265
Seven Year Itch, The, 258
Shakespeare, William, 154,

248, 251
Shane, 82, 170
5hindo, Kaneto, 265
Siamo donne, 196
Sight and sound. 11-12,

76-8, 222, 270-2
5ignoret, Simone, 29
Simmons, Jean, 133, 135
Singier, Gustave, 251
Sirk, Douglas, 12

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

<,jl
I
I

I

1

1

1

I

'·.1

", , .. /\0 -' ,,", I
i. .!

, ~"l!
, 'I

ji

.' 1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Page 326

Index of Names and Film Titles

So Close to Life, 63 ,',"
Soldati, Mario, 199
Something of Value, 147 :1 '.
Song is Born, A, 127
Sophocles, 241
Spillane, Mickey, 163
Stagecoach, 81, 170, 257
Stalin, Joseph, 235--6
Star is Born, A, 243, 245
Steel Helmet, The, 145--6,

148, 150-1, 153
Steiger, Rod, 147-9
Stendhal (Henri Seyle), 43,

198, 238
Sternberg, Josef von, 2
Stevens, George, 82, 170,

244
Stevenson, Robert Louis, 91
Stewart, James, 37, 137-9,

166
Strangers on a Train, 243
Stravinsky, Igor, 59, 66,

193, 200, 254
Stroheim, Erich von, 2, 7,

213, 253, 271, 275
Stromboli, 57, 63, 143, 194,

196, 201, 206, 209-12
Sturges, Preston, 232
Sue, Eugene, 236
Sullivan's Travels, 230 '
Summer with Monika, 50
Sunrise, 57, 207
Suspicion, 144
Suvarov, 237
Swamp Water, 30
Swift, Jonathan, 232-3

Tabu, 200, 278
Taradash, Dan, 94
Tarnished Angels. The, 51
Tartuffe, 128
Tashlin, Frank, 3, 116
TatL Jacques, 22
Temps Modernes, Les, 232
Terra trema, La, 187
Testament dll Dr Cordclier,

Le,60
They Live By Night, 107, 112,

124
Thillg from Another World.

Tlte, 127, 129, 161
Thirard, Armand, 50
Third Mall. The, 146
Tiger of EscJlllap"r, TIre, 225
Time to Lope and a Time ta

Die. A, 12
Titian, 48, 254

To Have and Have Not, 92,
129-30, 144

Toland, Gregg, 2, 254
Tolstoy, Leo, 248
Touchez pas au grisbi, 13.

23-4, 2S-30
Touch of Evil, 146
Tourneur, Jacques, 160
Toute la memoire du monde,

60
Traversee de Paris, La, 40, 43
Treasure of the Sierra Madre,

The, 100
Tricheurs, Les, 149
Trintignant, Jean-Louis, 49
True Heart Susie, 57, 89
True Story of Jesse James, Tile,

153
Truffaut, Fran~ois, 4-6,

9-10, 12-13, 21--6, 2S-30,
51, 53-7, 7~, 105,
107-10, 149, 175, 209-12,
221, 223, 249-50, 270-4

Two People, 132

Ugetsu monogatari, 224, 267
Ulmer, Edgar, 94
Ulysses, 36
Umber to D, 176, 180-1
Under Capricorn, 138, 200
Underworld, 160

Vadim, Roger, 13, 22-4, 38,
42-4. 47-50

Valentino. Rudolph. 98
Valery, Paul, 160, 199, 233
Vampyr, 13, 56
Van Dine, S. 5., 158
Van Dongen, Kees, 117
Van Gogh, Vincent. 249,

268
Van Vogt. A. E., 68
Varda, Agnes, 66-7
Velazquez, Diego

Rodriguez de Silva. 67
venus al'eugle. La. 57
Vermeer. Jan, 187
Verne, Jules, 68
Vertiso, 12
Vertov, Dziga. 182-3

312

BByerlscha
Staa\sblhliothek

Munchan

Viaggio ill Ita/ia, 144, 176,
192-203, 205-8, 211-12

Vian, Michele, 232
Vidor, King, 2, 35, 96
Vigo, Jean, 3, 51, 56, 150--1
Visconti, Luchino, 3, 36,

176, 187
Voltaire, 250, 252-3

Wahl, Jean, 190
Wajda, Andrzej, 3
Walsh, Raoul, 80, 96,

116-17, 159, 224
War arId Peace, 35
Wayne, John, 128
Weinberg, Herman, 2
Weis, Don, 7, 224
Welles, Orson, 2, 5, 7-8,49,

66, 75, 81, 95, 146, 153--4,
162, 197, 233, 236, 243,
245, 253-5

Where tire Sidewalk Ends, 162
While the City Sleeps, 243
Whirlpool, 134, 162
Widmark, Richard, 149
Wilde, Cornel, 117, 123
Wild Strawberries, 64
Williams, Warren, 158
Wind Across the Everglades,

12
Wise. Robert, 107, 162
Wollen, Peter, 77
Womal! il! the Moon, 141
Woman 011 the Beach, 132
Wood, Natalie, 112-14
Wood, Robin, 77-8, 224
Wray, Fay, 275
Wright, Frank Lloyd, 121-2
Wrong Mal!, The, 78, 141,

144
Wyler, William. 2, 38, 80

Yamamura, Satoru, 264
Yang Kwei-fei, 265
YOII Orlly Live Once, 143

Zavattini, Cesare. 3, 36,
180-1, 186, 188-9, 199

ltiY(! dt' ((mill/itt', 57
Zinnemann, Fred, 38
Zola, Emile. 230
Zukor. Adolph, 170

Similer Documents