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TitleBuilt to Meet Needs: Cultural Issues in Vernacular Architecture
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File Size21.5 MB
Total Pages475
Table of Contents
                            Title Page
Copyright Page
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
List of illustrations
	Illustration credits
Introduction
Part I: Defining the field
	1  Why study vernacular architecture? (1978)
	2  The importance of the study of vernacular architecture (1993)
		Defining the vernacular
		Approaches to the study of vernacular architecture
		Applications of vernacular research
		The importance of vernacular architecture studies
	3  Problems of definition and praxis (1999)
		Cross-cultural and interdisciplinary perspectives
		References
Part II: Cultures and contexts
	4  Learning from Asante (2000)
		References
	5  Cultural traits and environmental contexts: Problems of cultural specificity and cross-cultural comparability (1999)
		References
	6  Huizhou and Herefordshire: A comparative study (2001)
		Anhui and West Mercia
		References
		Additional references
	7  Tout confort: Culture and comfort (1986)
		Comfort and convenience
		References
Part III: Tradition and transmission
	8  Vernacular know-how (1982)
		References
	9  Earth as a building material today (1983)
		References
		Additional references
	10  Handed down architecture: Tradition and transmission (1989)
		References
	11  Technology transfer: A vernacular view (2003)
		References
Part IV: Cultures, disasters and dwellings
	12  The cultural context of shelter provision (1978)
		References
	13  Earthen housing and cultures in seismic areas (1984)
		References
	14  Factors affecting the acceptability of resettlement housing (1984)
		References
	15  Rebirth of a Rajput village (1992)
		References
Part V: Conservation and continuity
	16  Conserving the vernacular in developing countries (1986)
		Addendum
		References
		Additional references
	17  Re-presenting and representing the vernacular: The open-air museum (2001)
		References
		Anonymously authored museum guides cited:
	18  Perfect and plain: Shaker approaches to design (1990)
		References
		Additional references
Part VI: Suburbs and self-builders
	19  Individualizing Dunroamin (1992)
		References
		Additional references
	20  Round the houses (1983)
		References
	21  Kaluderica: High-grade housing in an illegal settlement (1989)
		Note
		References
Part VII: Meeting the challenge of the twenty-first century
	22  Tradition by itself... (2000)
		References
	23  Ethics and vernacular architecture (2000)
		References
	24  Necessity and sustainability: The impending crisis (2002)
		The educational challenge
		References
		Architectural conferences in year 2000
Conferences and publications
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

Built to Meet Needs

Page 237

40°N

60°N

20°N

20°S



40°S

80°W 60°W 90°E

40°N

60°N

20°N

20°S



40°S

RELIGIONS

Roman C.

Protestant

Animist

Muslim

Hindu

Buddhist

Note: Large Roman Catholic and
Jewish populations in the U. S. A.

Jewish (Israel)

Figure 13.7
Map of religions: Roman Catholic Christian, Protestant Christian, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, Jewish and Animist, where
practised in relation to the quake belts.

Page 238

AGRICULTURE

40°N

20°N

20°S



40°S

80°W 60°W
90°E

40°N

60°N

20°N

20°S



40°S

160°E

Irrigated

Ranching

Mediterranean Agric.

Rice farming

Subsistence Agriculture

Nomad Herds

Figure 13.8
Agriculture and economy: Subsistance agriculture, Mediterranean agriculture; irrigated and rice farming, nomadic pastoral and
ranching, within the quake belts.

Page 474

445

IN
D

E
XYang-Tse River, China 70

Yanlang (verandah) Huizhou,
China, 81

Yapese, Micronesia, 100–01, 103
Yir Yoront tribe, Australia, 165
Yucatan, Mexico, 201
Yugoslavia, xxvi, 366

Yunnan province, China, 102
Yurt, 42

Zambia, 113
Zemindar, 258
Zevi, B., 57

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