Download Animation from Pencils to Pixels: Classical Techniques for the Digital Animator PDF

TitleAnimation from Pencils to Pixels: Classical Techniques for the Digital Animator
PublisherFocal Press
ISBN 139780240806709
CategoryArts - Film
LanguageEnglish
File Size59.0 MB
Total Pages519
Document Text Contents
Page 2

ANIMATION
FROM PENCILS TO PIXeLS

Page 259

240 Chapter E ight

If a character is walking up a hill, or into a strong
wind, the forward lean will be much more pro-
nounced, so the out-of-balance position compen-
sates for the resistance, as shown at right.

Walking into resistance
requires leaning forward.

However, if the character is walking downhill, or
with a strong following wind (at right), the lean
will be backwards to compensate.

To give a natural fluidity to the arms, it will help
if the hands and wrists have some overlapping
action, as shown below. When the arm is mov-
ing backwards on a stride, open the wrist and
fingers up slightly to have it drag behind some-
what. Similarly, when the arm is moving forward
on a stride, bend the wrist a little more and have
the hand drag that way. The resulting feel will be
much more fluid and not like completely rigid ro-
bot arms.

Walking out of resistance
requires leaning backward.

Overlapping action on the hands and wrists makes the walk much more realistic.

Page 260

Pr inciples of Animation 241

An often-neglected fundamental point of a walk is the twist that oc-
curs in the body, illustrated at the right. When the right arm comes
forward, the right shoulder does too. However, when the left leg
comes forward at the same time, as is normal in any key stride posi-
tion, then there is a natural twist to the body. This twist reverses with
the next stride, where the left shoulder will be forward as well as the
right hip. Don’t over-exaggerate this twist in your walks, but a subtle
use of it will give the walk a more natural fluidity than if it was not
there.

Lastly, the head on a walk should be loosened up too. As the body
rises to the passing position, the neck can bend forward a little and
the nose and head drop down, as on the left, below. When the body
sinks down from the passing position to the next key position, the
neck could straighten a little, or even bend back slightly, so that the
head and face are a little upward, as on the right.

The body twists slightly
when walking, as the opposite
shoulder and hip move
forward.

The head moves with each step of a walk.

As with the body twist, do not make this movement too exaggerated, or you will end
up with the bobbing head of an imbecile or hillbilly kind of walk, perhaps the opposite
impression of what you intended. A finely tuned head movement will give a fluidity to
the walk that a more static neck and head will not have.

Walk Cycles
The walks illustrated so far depict a standard walk, moving from one side of the screen
to the other. However, there are occasions when a walk cycle is preferred. With a walk
cycle, all that is required is for the character to stride repeatedly in the same position
while the background pans past. A walk cycle is therefore a repeat action of an entire
walk sequence, from key stride one to key stride two and then back to key stride one
again.

Page 518

Index 499

Voice recording, see Soundtrack
Voice-over, definition, 492
Walk
cycles, 241–244
inbetweens, 236–241
key positions, 235
passing position, 235
personality walks and timing, 242–244
run animation, see Run

Web, see Internet
Wedge test, definition, 492
Weight, definition, 492
Weighted movement, animation
principles, 227–231
Weighting, three-dimensional
animation, 432, 436
Wide-angle lens, uses, 103–104
Williams, Richard, 34–35, 234, 293
Winchester, Royal, 425

Wipe, scene-to-scene transition, 132
Wooden, definition, 492

XSI, three-dimensional animation
creation, 420

Zip pan, technique, 383, 492
Zoom, definition, 492
Zoom lens, uses, 105–106

Page 519

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